Guitarist Paul Bielatowicz and bassist Simon Fitzpatrick to perform two New England gigs

Carl Palmer’s ELP Legacy Band guitarist Paul Bielatowicz, along with Legacy bandmate, bassist Simon Fitzpatrick, will bring their musical virtuosity to the Narrows Center in Fall River, Mass., on Dec. 19th (click HERE for tickets) and the Regent Theatre in Arlington, Mass., on Dec. 22nd (click HERE for tickets). 21CF opens the show at the Regent Theatre.

The virtuosos will perform many songs from Bielatowicz’s solo CD “Preludes & Etudes,” a representation of the electric guitar as a classical instrument, as well as some surprising classic rock songs and even a holiday medley.

Bielatowicz has toured the world as a member of both the Carl Palmer Band (Emerson, Lake & Palmer) and Neal Morse’s solo band (Spock’s Beard, Transatlantic), as well as appearing on recordings by Paul Gilbert, Mike Portnoy, Randy George and many others. Bielatowicz has also been a regular contributor for several music magazines, most notably writing a regular column for “Guitarist Magazine” and other UK based publications, where he has interviewed such amazing musicians as Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, among others, as well as providing transcriptions for “Guitar Techniques” magazine.

UK bassist Simon Fitzpatrick has toured and recorded with Jennifer Batten (Michael Jackson, Jeff Beck), Carl Palmer (Emerson, Lake & Palmer), Joe Lynn-Turner (Rainbow, Deep Purple), Kee Marcello (Europe) and Michael Hill (B.B. King) among others. Not content with simply being in the background, Fitzpatrick has always tried to take bass guitar playing as far as possible. Using all six strings of his extended range instrument, he performs as a lead player, a soloist or polyphonic accompanist. He has recently released his debut solo bass guitar album, “Reflections,” in which he uses his virtuoso technique to recreate a wide variety of pieces and styles, ranging from classical to classic rock, on one single instrument. You’ve never seen a bass guitar played like this before.

The Narrows Center for the Arts is located at 16 Anawan Street in Fall River, Mass., while the Regent Theatre is located at 7 Medford Street in Arlington, Mass. Parking is free at both venues.

Click HERE to see the the tour video promo!

 

Photo - Paul & Simon 2

Richard Marx to perform a night of hits at Narrows Center in Fall River

Photo - Richard Marx

FALL RIVER – Singer, songwriter, musician, and producer Richard Marx, whose hits include “Right Here Waiting,” “Don’t Mean Nothing” and “Hold On to the Nights,” will perform at the Narrows Center for the Arts in Fall River, MA, on Friday, May 27, 2016. Purchase tickets HERE.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, you couldn’t turn on the radio without hearing Marx’s songs. Beginning with his self-titled debut album in 1987, the Chicago native became the only male solo artist to have his first seven singles reach the Top 5 on the Billboard charts. Since then, he has sold over 30 million albums and has been nominated for three Grammys as a solo artist. Quite simply, Marx has created the soundtrack to the most memorable moments in people’s lives.

“I have written songs that are incredibly romantic – songs that people play at their weddings or that were playing when their kids were born,” said Marx in a press release. “They have traditionally dealt with the highest concept of forever.”

For most artists, that would be remarkable enough, but Marx didn’t stop there, launching a second incarnation as a songwriter and producer for other artists. He has written songs for Barbra Streisand, Josh Groban, Vince Gill, LeAnn Rimes, Natalie Cole, Travis Tritt, Jennifer Nettles, Daughtry, Lifehouse, and Luther Vandross, earning a 2004 Song of the Year Grammy for co-writing Vandross’ “Dance with My Father.”

Marx’s song “This I Promise You” was a massive hit for NSYNC in the autumn of 2000, while his country single with Keith Urban, “Long Hot Summer,” in 2011, enabled Marx to pull off the rare feat of having songs he has either written or co-written hit No. 1 in four separate decades.

The Narrows Center for the Arts is located at 16 Anawan Street. Tickets to his show can be purchased online HERE or by calling the box office at 508-324-1926. For those wanting to purchase tickets in person, box office hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 noon to 5 p.m.

Check out some of Richard’s Marx’s music videos below:

Right Here Waiting

Now and Forever

Hold On To The Nights

Endless Summer Nights

‘Friday the 13th: Part 2’ Filming Locations

Since today is Friday the 13th, we’re going to post some of the filming locations of “Friday the 13th: Part 2” (1981) to see what everything looks like today. In June 2015, I ventured to the towns of New Preston and Kent, CT, where much of the movie was filmed. As we did with the filming locations of the original “Friday the 13th” last year, the top photo is a screen shot taken from the movie. The photo underneath it is what the area looks like today. Unfortunately, all of the camp cabins used in the film that were located at North Spectacle Pond in Kent, CT, have been torn down.

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Hard rockers Y&T to perform at the Narrows Center

Photo - Y&T (website)Best known for hits that include “Meanstreak,” “Don’t Stop Runnin’,” and “Summertime Girls,” hard rockers Y&T will make their debut performance at the Narrows Center in Fall River, Mass., on March 8, 2016. Purchase tickets HERE.

Formed in the early 1970s, Y&T is one of the San Francisco Bay Area’s own innovators of the hard rock sound, influence bands such as Ratt, Motley Crue and Metallica. With over a dozen studio albums that have sold in excess of four million copies, Y&T always deliver. In fact, whether performing to a festival crowd of 50,000 or in an intimate venue like the Narrows Center, Y&T’s high-energy set and passionate performances still captivate legions of fans around the globe, proving Y&T’s music timeless.

For the band’s performance at the Narrows, Y&T will play songs that span the band’s over 40-year career, including all the hits and fan favorites for a show that will last two hours.

The Narrows Center is located at 16 Anawan Street in Fall River, Mass. All tickets are $35 and are available online by clicking HERE or by calling the box office at 508-324-1926. Parking is free.

Our top 25 horror films since 2000

Many people say that the best horror films came out in the 1970s and 1980s, but that simply is not the case. While there are definitely a number of classic flicks there were released during these two decades, the past 15 years have yielded a number of quality horror films that are just as good or even superior to their predecessors.

Since today is Halloween, we thought it would be festive to list our top 25 horror movies since 2000. We haven’t given any details about each film because you should be checking them out for yourselves and making your own judgments. For the fun of it, we included the “Tomatometer” from Rotten Tomatoes to see how the films rate from critics nationwide. Interestingly, only three of the films (i.e. High Tension, Saw and Tusk) fell below 50%. One film is currently tracking at 100%.

It should also be noted that we have not seen every horror film of the past 15 years, but have done our best to see as many as possible. This list will be revised if we find more flicks that are worthy of adding. We realize a list like this will trigger differing opinions so we welcome all of your comments.

  1. It Follows (2015)   [Tomatometer = 96% fresh]

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2. The Babadook (2014)   [Tomatometer = 98% fresh]

The Babadook

3. Martyrs (2008)   [Tomatometer = 50% fresh]

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4. Tusk (2014)   [Tomatometer = 40% fresh]

Tusk

5. Let Me In (2010)   [Tomatometer = 88% fresh]

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6. [Rec] 2 (2009)   [Tomatometer = 70% fresh]

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7. The Orphanage (2007)   [Tomatometer = 87% fresh]

The Orphanage

8. The Orphan (2009)   [Tomatometer = 55% fresh]

The Orphan

9. Inside (2007)   [Tomatometer = 83% fresh]

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10. The Invitation (2015)   [Tomatometer = 100% fresh]

invitation

11.House of the Devil (2009)   [Tomatometer = 86% fresh]

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12. Saw (2004)   [Tomatometer = 48% fresh]

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13. Behind the Mask (2006)   [Tomatometer = 74% fresh]

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14. High Tension (2003)  [Tomatometer = 41% fresh]

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15. The Conjuring (2013)   [Tomatometer = 86% fresh]

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16. Rec (2007)   [Tomatometer = 90% fresh]

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17. Starry Eyes (2014)   [Tomatometer = 74% fresh]

Starry Eyes

18. The Children (2008)   [Tomatometer = 73% fresh]

TheChildren

19. Cold Prey (2006)   [Tomatometer = No Score]

Cold Prey

20. Session 9 (2001)   [Tomatometer = 63% fresh]

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21. Sleep Tight (2012)   [Tomatometer = 93% fresh]

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22. Afflicted (2014)   [Tomatometer = 79% fresh]

Afflicted

23. The Mind’s Eye (2015)   [Tomatometer = No Score]

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24. Them (2006)   [Tomatometer = 61% fresh]

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25. Ginger Snaps (2000)   [Tomatometer = 89% fresh]

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Honorable Mentions: Frontier(s), The Hills Have Eyes, Hostel, May, Maniac, Midnight Meat Train, The Sacrament, Saw IV and Saw VI.

ADVERTISEMENT - Y&T @ Narrows Center in Fall River, MA ON March 8, 2016. Click on image to purchase tickets.
ADVERTISEMENT – Y&T @ Narrows Center in Fall River, MA on March 8, 2016. Click on image to purchase tickets.

Rusted Root to perform at Narrows Center in Fall River on Dec. 10th

Photo - Rusted Root 2015

With seven studio albums, over three million records sold worldwide, and countless nights on the road, Rusted Root return to the Narrows Center in Fall River, Mass., on Dec. 10, 2015, at 8 p.m.. Click HERE for tickets!

Formed in the early 90’s by singer/guitarist Michael Glabicki, Rusted Root’s worldly style quickly charmed fans of roots music and world rock. After debuting in 1992 with the self-released Cruel Sun, Rusted Root signed with Mercury Records and released the 1994 platinum selling breakthrough When I Woke, which featured the massive hits “Send Me On My Way,” “Ecstasy,” and “Martyr.” Their success allowed the band to tour with Santana, The Grateful Dead, Dave Matthews Band, The Allman Brothers Band, and perhaps most notably, the highly coveted support role on the landmark Jimmy Page/Robert Plant reunion tour.

In 1996, the hard-touring Rusted Root returned with Remember,”which was followed by Rusted Root (1998), Welcome To My Party (2002), Rusted Root Live (2004), Stereo Rodeo (2009) and The Movement (2012). Along the way, Rusted Root has also issued three EPs, a home video and had songs placed in film and TV soundtracks such as “Twister,” “Mathilda,” “Home For the Holidays,” “Party of Five,” “Charmed,” and “Ice Age.” What was indubitably a first for Rusted Root was that NASA engineers chose “Send Me On My Way” as “wake-up” music for the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, for Sol 21. “Send Me On My Way” was also used in a set of Enterprise Rental Car commercials in 2011 and 2012.

For their show at the Narrows Center, expect to hear their hits, fan favorites and other surprises!

The Narrows Center is located at 16 Anawan Street in Fall River, Mass. Tickets are available online through www.narrowscenter.org or by calling the box office at 508-324-1926. Parking is free.

Phoebe Legere bringing Cajun music and more to Orleans, Mass.

Phoebe Legere (Submitted Photo)

By JAY KENNEY

If there’s anyone who could be classified as a “Renaissance Woman,” it’s Phoebe Legere. The Maine native who is of Acadian and Abenaki (First Nations) descent, sings, plays a number of instruments (piano, accordion, cello, Native American flute, organ, buffalo drum, synthesizer, guitar and cavaquinho), stared in several films (Mondo New York and Toxic Avenger 2 & 3), paints, draws, sculpts, and writes movies and musicals. She also founded the New York Underground Museum in 2006 and was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in Music in 2000. She’s released over 15 CDs of original music and will be appearing at Brick Hill House Concerts on Sunday, Aug. 30th, in Orleans, MA. We recently caught up with Legere who didn’t hold back in her answers to our questions.

Limelight Magazine (LM): You’re going to be performing at Brick Hill House Concerts on Aug. 30th in Orleans, MA. For anyone who has not seen you perform live before, what can they expect at this show?
Phoebe Legere: This is an excellent and fair question, but it is impossible for me to answer. I cannot see myself when I am performing, nor can I predict how I will be perceived by others. I can only tell you what I feel when I play music. I go on a journey inside myself into a cosmos of memory, desire and ideal beauty. There are spirits there, spirits of my ancestors and of animals. These spirits seem to hover near! They are very interested in the music. Spirit voices suggest things to me, ideas about color, pitch, timbre, re-harmonization and expression. My eyes may appear to be seeing the audience, but in fact, I am looking into a place beyond space and time. I feel deep love and compassion for my audience. I read them with my heart as I play.

I play rhythms and notes and what I feel will soften hard places in their hearts and heal sad places in their minds. My job is to bring the music medicine to the people. That is why my native name is Phoebe Songbundle. I can be very photogenic, but cameras do not see very well. In person, I hover between pretty and ugly, male and female, young and old, white and Native. That is a good place to be. People soon forget how I look and they begin to go on the journey with me.

Music is a magic canoe that can take you down the river of your own dreams. In that journey you will find your own ancestors and spirits of animals who can guide you to heal yourself. I channel the music of my ancestors – French Acadians, Abenaki Native Americans, Wampanoag ancestors who ran to Maine and Canada and joined the Abenaki during the Massachusetts holocaust, and yes, my Mayflower Puritan ancestors too. I’m descended from a few of the travelers including Bradford and a young woman named Remember Allerton. They named her Remember so we would never forget how the Puritans were treated by the English.

I have to heal the pain of those ancestors who are still grieving because of the territorial and linguistic incursions of Imperialist England into North America at that time. You will also hear elements of church music in my note choices. I grew up in a small colonial town in Massachusetts where I sang in the choir and played the organ in the church.

LM: Will you be performing solo or with a band and do you have a preference for one over the other?
Legere: I have invited musical friends from the area to play with me. Notably, my friend singer-songwriter George Leonard, a 2015 inductee into the Rhode Island Music Hall of Fame, will play fiddle with me. I love to be part of a team. When we play together we are than the sum of our parts – music is prayer – everyone knows it’s easier to get the Lord’s attention if there’s a crowd praying the same song.

LM: You’ve released 15 CDs of original music. How do you go about deciding on a set list for your shows?
Legere: I use my intuition in everything I do. On the Cape I will play more of my maritime songs: “Big Sperm Whale,” (click on song title) “Heart of the Summer,” (click on song title) and “Sailing on the Sound.” When I am in French Canada, I do mostly French, but this far south I’ll sing mostly English.

LM: In some of your promotional materials, it says you “reinvented Cajun music in your own image, mixing New York City jazz funk with New Orleans blues, down-home Acadian bluegrass, story-telling and melody.” How would you describe your music to someone else?
Legere: I play North American music. An oyster makes a pearl from the pain of a grain of sand. Similarly, my music grows from the pain of forced human migration. What do I mean? Well, in 1755 the Acadians were deported to Louisiana – that’s how we get Cajun music at the same time Africans were being moved, forcefully, in chains, from beautiful Africa to places where they were treated like animals. The Cajuns (Acadians) were an underclass everywhere they went, since social status is all about territory and having a big house and an established business. The English had burned our houses and took our land. All we had was family and music. The Cajuns intermarried with the Africans and that’s when the music started to get really interesting. It’s called jazz. This is the vein I am working. Where Acadian music meets Black music. I like it and I feel right at home in this type of groove. To this Jambalya, I add plenty of Native American, French and classical elements. Yes, I went to Juilliard. Yes, I sing at Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall. Yes, I write for and conduct Symphony Orchestras. Yes, I was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in Music. But when I play folk music at a house concert, I am just that. I am a woman of the people, a down to earth, real person born on the 4th of July.

LM: You sing, play several instruments including the piano, accordion, cello, Native American flute, organ, buffalo drum, synthesizer, guitar and cavaquinho, as well as write memorable songs. When did you take an interest in music?
Legere: I started playing the piano before age three. I reached up and could feel the keys. That is when I started. I began composing at six and I’ve been professional since age nine.

LM: What was the first instrument you learned how to play and why did you decide to pursue other instruments?
Legere: In those days there was a strict division of instruments into “male” and “female.” The piano was feminine, a nice thing for a little girl to learn. My mother forbid me to play guitar. They directed me instead, to the cello, which was my main instrument for many years. My sister wanted to play drums and vibes. She was forced to play the flute. My other sisters played violin and viola so naturally I picked those up and started playing them. My grandfather played accordion. The accordion had fallen out of favor by the time I reached adolescence, but I found one in the attic. The minute I squeezed it I was hooked. The expressiveness of the reeds is like the sighting of the sun, the cries of immigrant populations! The accordion is the true instrument of the people! And what’s more, you can move while you play it. I love to hear the sound waves swirling around me as I stroll with my accordion.

When I got involved with performance art many of the galleries and museums where I played did not have a piano. The accordion was perfect.

I was signed to Epic records at 16. They said “Phoebe, don’t let anyone see you carrying THAT THING!” (the accordion was that thing). Now, as with so many of my visionary ideas, everyone realizes I was right all along. The whole world now knows the accordion is the hippest instrument. I have much more to say about the accordion and music as a mind control tool of government BTW

LM: You have a very impressive biography. Of all of your accomplishments, what was your proudest moment so far?
Legere: Singing my poem, The Waterclown, with the Cleveland Chamber Symphony in 2000. (Pulitzer Nomination 2000). The topic, water, the privatization of water and the importance of water in climate change has become one of the hottest topics in enviro-politics now. You can listen free to the mp3 on my website: http://www.phoebelegere.com/waterclown.html. Also hear me conducting and singing my classical chamber trio called STARS on the same page.

LM: Outside of music, you’ve also appeared in several cult films including Mondo New York and Toxic Avenger 2 & 3. Did you like your experience working on these films? Are you still actively pursuing film projects?
Legere: I write movies and I make my living writing music for movies. I have a degree in film scoring from NYU. As my late friend Roger Vadim once said, “Film is a perfect synthesis of sound and image.”

I direct and produce all of my music videos. My movie The Shamancycle Story, (about my 15 person rideable eagle sculpture made from up cycled and re-purposed junk), had a limited run in art houses last year. It could be viewed as a 20 minute extended music video for my song “Love is Your Power,” but you can also hear me singing the traditional, 10,000 year old Creation Hymn in there too.

My early music videos, “Marilyn” and “Trust Me,” were collaborations with Nile Southern, Terry Southern’s son. I was very influenced by Terry Southern. Terry wrote Easy Rider, Doctor Strangelove, Candy, The Magic Christian, and most of Barbarella. He was an important writer until Nixon put him on the Enemies List after which he could not work in Hollywood.

Nile and I lived with Terry in an old farmhouse in Connecticut. Terry’s ideas about movies and writings were a profound influence.

LM: You’re also a painter who founded the New York Underground Museum in 2006 to preserve the works of artists whose works are not held by major institutions. Why is preserving these works so important to you?
Legere: NYUM presents, preserves and curates the work of visionary artists whose work is not held by major institutions. In 2006 there was a show called the East Village show. I could not help but notice that women, artists of color, handicapped artists, ethic artists and Native Americans were not represented in this show. However, Madonna and Debbie Harry were in the show. This showed me how corporate culture not so subtly invades the world of high art. I wanted to create a zone of beauty and vision that was protected from the dominant money culture.

LM: What artists do you currently listen to?
Legere: Daniel Lavoie, Congolese hip hop such as Baloji but also the hip hop made by 12 year old soldiers in the Congo.

I listen CDs made by families who sing the old Acadian songs, like “C’est d’même que ça commencé” by La famille Doiron who sang with me on my Canadian tour 2015, I listen to George Leonard and Ray Legere my cousin.

I listen to CD’s I made from Brown Wax cylinders created at the turn of the century by someone who went in and recorded the oldest Abenaki/Penobscot elders singing the old medicine songs, (the cylinders were in a flood so they were covered with mildew, hard to listen to, but I was (able to extract some basic Abenaki medicine motifs later, when I went to visit the Maliseet, who speak a very similar language to us, they had the same songs and we understood each other, you can hear me singing in this (language on “Blue Canoe Blues” (click on song title) on Soundcloud.)

I listen to the very old gospel recorded before it all became a business, I listen to the Smithsonian Folkways recordings.

I listen to the radio just to see how bad it is. Yes. I listen to Top 40 and I realize with horror that somebody has now created computer program to determine the words and images from the top three songs in each year for the past 30 years and that is how the music is being made now. You think a song was written by an inspired artist songwriter? No. Music is now ghost written by teams of writers who market test the lyrics on subject fitted with electrodes. I was on a major label for three years. Epic/Sony. I know how these people operate and they are beyond scared shitless. They leave nothing to chance. How about that song “Shut Up and Dance.” Yes consumers listen closely.

I listen closely to the top 10 songs to hear the subliminal messages embedded behind the lyrics. I listen to the machines used in the productions. Your consent is engineered.

I listen to RFI the French global internet radio station. They play a lot of African music that interests me. I play with an African drummer named Joachim Lartey. He knows 2000 West African shamanic drum beats. It’s kind of cool and sad that the Zulus are now doing house music. It sounds better than the crap I have to listen wherever I go in America, but African rhythms are one of the cultural treasures of the worlds and it’s tragic to see the Zulus handing their power to a machine. Africans used to say: “The drum is the voice of God!”

How do I know so much about Africa? I went to Africa in 1987 with Nile. We lived at Peter Beard’s Hog Ranch. We visited the Masai Mara. We lived with the Kikuyu tribesmen who had lived with Karen Blixen. I learned many things [such as] creativity, music, dance and costume.

That is how I got the idea for Hello Mrs. President, [which was] my musical about the first black woman President of the USA starring Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Famer LaVerne Baker and me as (the First Partner).

I listen to early early blues artists like Howling Wolf, Big Bill Broonzy, Robert Johnson, Son House, John Lee Hooker, Sunnyland Slim…you want me to go on? I was the Blues DJ on Sirius Radio for two years.’

I had a friend named Boris Rose who recorded all the radio broadcasts of the 40’s. That was when radio had good music. The major labels were still signing musical geniuses.

Boris made me cassettes of the broadcasts from the Royal Roost and the big ballrooms. He made tapes of the great boogie boogie and blues pianists who came through New York City and that’s how I developed my blues piano style, as well as spending a great deal of time in Louisiana with my grandmother. We are connected to all the Legere’s and Trahans in Eunice and Lafayette, LA. I listen to early New Orleans R&B. I love the period just after World War 2 when jazz was just morphing into rock ‘n roll. I love it.

I can’t get enough music. I never tire of it. I studied jazz piano with John Lewis of the Modern Jazz Quartet but I have also hung out with and played with the best modern piano players from Nola’s great blind Henry Butler to my friend Billy Joel. Do I listen to Frank Sinatra, Billy Holiday, Big Joe Turner, Charles Trenet and Jacques Brel? You bet I do. I am an ear person. I listen to poetry being read by poets too. It is amazing what is available on YouTube.

My best listening time is when I am not listening. In the silence I hear my own symphonies, melodies, ideas and songs.

LM: Is there anything else you’d like to add for those reading this?
Legere: I like music, I like musicians and I like people who like music. I like to listen in a group. Music is more important than people think. Music is the vibration that is creating the illusion of reality and music is the telescope that lets you see through the illusion. That is why, in the old days, before industrial music and machine music, music was the glue that held families together. That’s why they call it music harmony. I have created a free art and music camp for the high poverty at risk children of New York City. This is my passion. I am a natural teacher and that my greatest love is nurturing the visionary artists and musicians of the future.

Did you see the drums I made – White Eagle Drum and Golden Wolf Drum with Abenaki symbols? I’ll be playing them at Brick Hill House.

For more information about Legere, please visit www.phoebelegere.com.

Phoebe Legere
Phoebe Legere will be playing the custom drums she created at the Brick Hill House Concerts in Orleans, Mass., on Sunday, Aug. 30th.

Music and entertainment coverage since October 2006!

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