The Cassette Chronicles – Reo Speedwagon’s ‘Hi Infidelity’

By JAY ROBERTS

The Cassette Chronicles is a continuing series of mini reviews and reflections on albums from the 1980’s and 1990’s. The aim of this series is to highlight both known and underappreciated albums from rock, pop and metal genres from this time period through the cassette editions of their releases. Some of the albums I have known about and loved for years, while others are new to me and were music I’ve always wanted to hear. There will be some review analysis and my own personal stories about my connection with various albums. These opinions are strictly my own and do not reflect the views of anyone else at Limelight Magazine.

REO SPEEDWAGON – HI INFIDELITY (1980)

While this series is called The Cassette Chronicles, if you were to file this particular article under a sub-heading it would likely be “Albums My Mother Wouldn’t Buy For Me When I Was A Kid Because of the Cover Art”. I think if you look at the cover art and remember the time that it came out, you can probably understand why a parent wouldn’t buy the album for her nine year old. I actually had to hear the album in full for the first time at a friend’s house because he had it while I was out of luck until a few years later when I got my first job and could buy whatever music I wanted.

The funny thing is, the album art actually didn’t make any impression on me at that age. Instead, it was the song “Tough Guys” that made me want to have the album. Between the audio snippet from the “Our Gang” serials (“The Little Rascals” for those who don’t recall the other name) that fronted the song to Kevin Cronin singing “She thinks they’re full of shit”, to a nine year old who loved the “The Little Rascals” and didn’t quite yet have fluency in profanity, this was just a COOL song!

Of course, without strong songs the album wouldn’t have gone anywhere. However, a lack of material wasn’t a problem for REO Speedwagon on this album. The songs ranged from straight up rockers, power ballads and even songs that sounded as if they belonged in another era (The song “In Your Letter” stirs up echoes of 60’s pop music).

The first side of the album features the most recognizable of the band’s songs. Kicking off with the sublime rocker “Don’t Let Him Go”, the band moved with ease from one song to the next and keeps things on an electrifying high throughout. I think anyone who grew up in the 80’s has to know the #1 hit “Keep On Loving You”. This was back when the ballads were part of the whole instead of that calculated “We Need A Love Song” type of track so I actually still rather enjoy the song.

As for “Follow My Heart”, it’s got a huge hook to it but at the same time it’s a dynamically powerful vocal performance set to a killer rock sound as well. “Take It On The Run” was another big hit for the band and it remains one of the songs I remember liking right away when I first heard it.

The second side of the album kicks off with “Tough Guys” and like I said, I really love the song for reasons explained above, plus the fact that it’s just a damn fine rocker. As for the rest of the song on Side Two, I think it is probably less remembered than Side One because it has more album tracks than singles but the song “Out of Season” is an outright underappreciated classic. It’s a burning bright rocker and I have to say that I probably forgot how much I liked it until listening to the album again for this article. “Shakin’ It Loose” also rocks out pretty fast. “Someone Tonight” isn’t quite as fast, but still moves to a quicker beat. The album closes with “I Wish You Were There” which despite the notion the song’s title might give you, isn’t quite the same kind of ballad that “Keep On Loving You” is. However, like that song, “I Wish You Were There” is a rather appealing number (the backing chorus helps give an extra dimension of depth to the song) and actually does a pretty remarkable job of straddling the line between rocker and ballad to bring the album to a fully satisfying conclusion.

While these days the band occupies the classic rock package tours you see going out every summer, REO Speedwagon was arguably the hottest band in the country in the early 80’s on the strength of the Hi Infidelity. If this album was released today, it would be filed under the “melodic rock” banner. However you think of the band, this was a huge high point for them and for my money, the album still resonates as strongly today as it did back then.

NOTES OF INTEREST: Hi Infidelity has been certified ten times platinum and hit #1 on the album chart when it was released. The album was reissued in 2011 for the 30th anniversary and included a second disc that had demo tracks from the original recording sessions.

Guitarist Gary Richrath, who passed away in 2015, left the band in 1989.

Mr. Mister’s Richard Page is credited with providing backing vocals on the album.

 

‘Mysterious Items of the Occult’ event at Narrows Center in Fall River, Mass.

Are you a fan of “The Conjuring” and “Annabelle” films? Are you interested in the mysterious and sometimes terrifying realm of the supernatural that inspired these films? Do you want to know more about the case files of famed paranormal researchers Ed & Lorraine Warren? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then join us on August 3rd for an event like no other at the Narrows Center in Fall River, MA. Purchase tickets HERE.

For this supernatural evening called “Mysterious Items of the Occult,” we welcome you to join us as Mr. Spera discusses the real stories of the Warren Case films, including “The Conjuring” and “Amityville Horror” cases. After you hear these intense stories, Tony Spera, son-in-law of Ed & Lorraine Warren, will present the Conjuring mirror, a five-foot antique mirror used for summoning spirts, as well as other infamous and diabolical objects from Ed & Lorraine Warren’s Occult Museum, which houses the largest array of haunted artifacts and items that have been used in occult practices throughout the world.

Along with these detailed accounts, you will get to witness an actual exorcism of a farmer from Massachusetts and hear actual recordings taken from the Enfield Poltergeist case featured in “The Conjuring 2.” The Enfield Poltergeist is a case of demonic possession that the Warren’s helped investigate for a family in England.

Participants will also view a video tour of the museum, hosted by Mr. Spera and the late Ed Warren who died in 2006. In the video, Mr. Warren discusses in detail the various artifacts housed within the museum.

Lastly, Mr. Spera will answer any burning questions you may have about the paranormal realm.

The Narrows Center is located at 16 Anawan Street. Tickets to his show can be purchase online HERE or by calling the box office at 508-324-1926. For those wanting to purchase tickets in person, box office hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 noon to 5 p.m.

ABOUT TONY SPERA

Tony Spera is a paranormal researcher and the son-in-law of famed paranormal researchers, Lorraine and Edward Warren. Tony has worked with the Warren’s since the mid 1980’s and is considered an expert in paranormal research. A former police officer, Tony holds an Associates degree in Law Enforcement and a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Connecticut. He has appeared on several paranormal television reality shows and has spoken at numerous colleges and universities. Tony was a consultant on two movies, “The Conjuring” and “The Conjuring 2” released by New Line Cinemas. He lives in Connecticut with his wife, Judy.

The Cassette Chronicles – Dio’s ‘Dream Evil’

By JAY ROBERTS

The Cassette Chronicles is a continuing series of mini reviews and reflections on albums from the 1980’s and 1990’s. The aim of this series is to highlight both known and underappreciated albums from rock, pop and metal genres from this time period through the cassette editions of their releases. Some of the albums I have known about and loved for years, while others are new to me and were music I’ve always wanted to hear. There will be some review analysis and my own personal stories about my connection with various albums. These opinions are strictly my own and do not reflect the views of anyone else at Limelight Magazine.

DIO – DREAM EVIL (1987)

I’d like to say that I can remember exactly where I picked up the cassette edition of Dio’s Dream Evil album, but I simply have no idea. What I do remember was the reasons I bought it when I saw it. I know that I never saw an ad for it in one of the many music magazines I read back in 1987. Instead, I stumbled upon the album while searching through the wall display at whichever record store I was standing in at the time.

There’s a couple of reasons why the album appealed to me. The first is that at the time I was still a relative newbie to rock and metal fandom and my love of comic books made the song title “Sunset Superman” stand out to me. Yes, it’s a bit silly of a reason to be interested in buying something sight unseen but it’s true. The other reason is that as a new metal fan, I loved the album title and creepy seemingly evil cover art. Again, I know it sounds rather a trite reason but there you go.

Of course, you might be wondering why the simple fact of it being a Dio release wasn’t the reason I bought it. Well, sad to say this but until this album, I really didn’t have any exposure to Ronnie James Dio. I know, right? Living in this world and not knowing who Dio is? I feel a bit ashamed to even admit that fact.

But I think I’ve more than made up for that musical blunder on my part, which I’ll get to later.

As for the album, I know that most people likely prefer Dio’s first three solo album Holy Diver, The Last In Line and Sacred Heart but for me, Dream Evil remains an album that I completely adore.

The album is mostly a fast paced rocking affair. The nine songs on the album all stand out in some way or another. The title track is appropriately themed and the opening song “Night People” gets things off in a rousing fashion.

I’d say that there is a lot more keyboard in the overall sound on this album but I think it helps rather than hurts the material. Of course, there are varying degrees of tempo even within the rocking tracks. “Overlove” (which for some reason appears in bold type on the cassette liner notes while the rest of the songs are printed in normal type) is pretty hard driving, particularly with Craig Goldy’s guitars screaming alongside Dio’s vocals.

When Dio and company (Goldy, drummer Vinnie Appice, bassist Jimmy Bain and keyboardist Claude Schnell) do take their foot off the gas, the tracks “All The Fools Sail Away” and “I Could Have Been A Dreamer” are the result. Each song is simply an epic in and of itself.  On the former, I loved the way Dio sang the lyric line “We bring you fantasy” with a clean and clear delivery and then followed that up with “We bring you pain” with a really dark sounding growl added to the vocal. It’s those small little things that made me instantly love the album.

Now, I mentioned how I didn’t know about Dio before buying this album. It’s been a quite a turnaround for me in that regard. I am a huge fan of Dio these days, to the point of being rather protective of his music whenever I heard a cover band playing one of his tracks. I guess you could say I’m kind of bitchy about it actually. I’ve heard versions where the singer doesn’t quite hit the mark and I can feel the misplaced ire rising inside of me. It’s sad, but true.

I’ve bought everything I could get my hands on as well. Whether it is The Elves, Elf, Rainbow, Black Sabbath, Heaven and Hell or his solo material, if it features Dio (and I’ve heard of it) I’ve picked it up. I can’t get enough of his vocals, of which I am an unabashed fan. I had a friend of mine mention that Dio is the best pure singer that rock and metal has ever had and while there are plenty of other singers I both like and love, I find it hard to disagree with that assertion.

I should mention that the cassette I bought back in 1987 is the one that I listened to in advance of writing this article. It still works fine and the music sounds as great as the first time I listened to it. I tried to see if there was something I didn’t like but I came up empty.

Last week marked nine years since the death of Ronnie James Dio, and yet his legacy remains not only intact but it still seems to be growing. While there is much to celebrate from his career, Dream Evil is not only the starting point for my love of Dio, but it is the benchmark to which I always find myself returning to over and over again.

NOTES OF INTEREST: The Dio Disciples band, which is officially endorsed by Dio’s widow features Craig Goldy in that lineup. They played a show in New Bedford, MA, last summer that I attended. I had purchased a CD edition of Dream Evil prior to that show and it now bears Goldy’s signature.

Meanwhile, bassist Jimmy Bain, drummer Vinny Appice and keyboardist Claude Schnell formed Last In Line in 2012 following Dio’s death in 2010 with original Dio guitarist Vivian Campbell and released the album Heavy Crown in 2016, though Schnell was out of the band before the album was recorded. Jimmy Bain died in 2016 after the album was released. Last in Line has played two shows in New Bedford in the last year or so.

Dream Evil is the last album that featured the mascot Murray on the album cover art.

The Cassette Chronicles – McAuley-Schenker’s ‘Save Yourself’

By JAY ROBERTS

The Cassette Chronicles is a continuing series of mini reviews and reflections on albums from the 1980’s and 1990’s. The aim of this series is to highlight both known and underappreciated albums from rock, pop and metal genres from this time period through the cassette editions of their releases. Some of the albums I have known about and loved for years, while others are new to me and were music I’ve always wanted to hear. There will be some review analysis and my own personal stories about my connection with various albums. These opinions are strictly my own and do not reflect the views of anyone else at Limelight Magazine.

McAULEY-SCHENKER GROUP – SAVE YOURSELF (1989)

Though this article is about the second McAuley-Schenker Group album, I first need to go back to the group’s 1987 debut album Perfect Timing album.

In ’87, I was 16 and had a job where I was making my own money. I had very little in the way of bills and could spend the money I made any way I wanted to. Since this was before the Internet and the idea of hearing songs before the album was even released, I would on occasion buy albums just from seeing an advertisement in a magazine. And yes, you could go to the record store knowing that they’d have the album in stock, imagine that!

So I saw the ad for Perfect Timing and was struck by how cool the guy with the guitar looked with his long flowing hair (This would be at the time when I still thought that I could grow my hair long to fit in more with the look of the day). I say “the guy” because I had no idea who Michael Schenker was at the time. As you recover from that bit of musical blasphemy, let’s just say once I did get the album, I was blown away. The album sounded like everything I loved at the time. Commercially accessible sound full of flying guitar work, killer rock tracks and believe it or not, really great ballad tracks. I was hooked!

So when I saw the news that the band was releasing a second album, it went to the top of my list. And with Save Yourself, they didn’t disappoint in the least.

The album kicked off with the title track. The song opens with a kind of mood setting lone bell ringing in the background before Schenker lets loose with a killer opening riff/solo. The song then bursts into flames as waves of pure energetic rock flow over you. Describing the song as fast paced fails to do justice to how relentless it is. Unsurprisingly, the band shreds throughout the song and McAuley’s vocals are not only on point with rapid fire they are in the delivery, but they are also really gritty in the vocal inflections. I’l say that by this point, he’d become a singer I greatly admired at the time. I thought he was just a fantastic vocalist!

While “Bad Boys” is slightly less frantic in the delivery, it is still a pretty uptempo anthem that kept me on the edge of my seat.

When talking about Perfect Timing earlier in the article, I mentioned how I loved the power ballad tracks on the album. You can say that about those type of tracks on Save Yourself as well. The song “Anytime” gave the band their most successful track of their three album run in terms of chart recognition. And while I’m really down on ballads these days, it is a highly enjoyable song.

The more rocking side of the band returns with “Get Down To Bizness”. The first side of the album comes to a killer conclusion with more of a mid-tempo rocker called “Shadow of the Night”. The track settles quickly into a groove quickly and locks it in for the length of the song.

Every song on the first side of the album is superb, and it sets the stage for more rocking good music on side two. I will say that while the instrumental “There Has To Be Another Way” wasn’t quite necessary to be included, it is a pretty decent run through by Schenker and company.

Otherwise, the second side of the album features five more songs that further cemented my opinion of just how great the band was at the time. “What We Need” kicks things off, rocking its way into your head. The title of “I Am Your Radio” might seem a bit silly, but when you listen to the song, it’s an undeniable rocker that captures the imagination and if you are like me, it kind of served as a personal anthem at the time you first heard it.

“This Is My Heart” definitely falls under the power ballad classification but it has far more of an uptempo feel to it at the same time. The lyrical sentiments are what gives it the ballad feel, but I really appreciated the lack of complete slowdown musically.

Two more adrenalized rockers close out Save Yourself with “Destiny” being a blazingly fast and intense track and “Take Me Back” sealing the deal for just how great the McAuley-Schenker Group was. The musical partnership between singer and guitarist was a fertile mix of great guitar and vocals and had both the songs and musical chops to pull off this vastly commercial sounding project that is flush with great music that doesn’t give you the feeling that they were “selling out” for more of a chance at monetary success.

At the beginning of the McAuley-Schenker Group’s run, I didn’t realize that this more mainstream hook laden sound was not what Schenker was best known for. I know that the majority of his fans comes from Schenker’s time with the Scorpions, UFO and the Michael Schenker Group. But for me, the three McAuley-Schenker albums will always be what I most remember him for. My love for Robin McAuley’s vocals remains unabated as well.

If you love great guitar work with the more accessible sound of the mid-to-late 80’s rock and metal, you’d be doing yourself a great service by picking up Save Yourself and diving headlong into some of the most entertaining rock of the day.

NOTES OF INTEREST: I attended the May 10th, 2019, Michael Schenker Fest concert in Worcester, MA. The show featured Michael Schenker playing songs from throughout his career and included Robin McAuley singing three songs from Save Yourself (plus one from Perfect Timing) during the course of the show. In fact, given the band lineup for this tour, four-fifths of the lineup that recorded the Save Yourself album (including drummer Bodo Schopf and guitarist Steve Mann) were onstage during the performance! It was utterly awesome for me!

The album got a Japanese reissue in 2000 that included three bonus tracks. Two of them were the radio single edits of “Save Yourself” and “Anytime” but the third bonus cut was a previously unreleased song called “Vicious”.

The album was produced by Frank Fillepetti, who had produced Survivor’s Too Hot To Sleep album in 1988. Singer Robin McAuley would go on to front Survivor for five years between 2006-2011, though he never recorded any music with the band.

Iconic band The Zombies to play the Narrows Center in Fall River, MA

When it comes to influential 60s bands,iconic British rock legends The Zombies are right at the top with The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and The Beach Boys. With their recent induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, the band is celebrating this achievement with a special summer tour that will stop at the Narrows Center in Fall River, MA, on August 27th at 8 p.m. Purchase tickets HERE.

The Zombies is still led by founding members Colin Blunstone (vocals) and Rod Argent (keyboards), alongside Steve Rodford on drums, renowned session guitarist Tom Toomey, and new member, Søren Koch, who joined the band following the untimely passing of The Zombies’ beloved bassist Jim Rodford (formerly of Argent and The Kinks) in early 2018.

The Zombies scored U.S. hits in the mid- and late-1960s with “Time of the Season,” “She’s Not There,” and “Tell Her No.” Their 1968 album “Odessey & Oracle” is ranked 100 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. The band’s live performances, described by Rolling Stone as “absolutely triumphant,” take fans on a journey through time, from their early hits…their 1968 masterpiece ‘Odessey & Oracle”…post-Zombies solo favorites such as Argent’s “Hold Your Head Up”…right to today with “Still Got That Hunger.”

The Zombies are also cited as being one of the most influential UK pop/rock bands of all time. Billy Joel, Paul Weller, and the band Badly Drawn Boy are just some of the artists that have been influenced by The Zombies. Their songs are covered regularly by artists such as Beck and Belle and Sebastian and have been used in numerous film and TV shows, including “The Conjuring” and “The Simpsons.” Aside from The Beatles and perhaps The Beach Boys, no mid-’60s rock group wrote melodies as gorgeous as those of The Zombies.

The Narrows Center is located at 16 Anawan Street in Fall River, Mass. Tickets can  be purchased online by clicking HERE or by calling the box office at 508-324-1926. Box office hours are Wednesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. and during show times.

The Cassette Chronicles – BONNIE TYLER’S ‘SECRET DREAMS AND FORBIDDEN FIRE’

By JAY ROBERTS

The Cassette Chronicles is a continuing series of mini reviews and reflections on albums from the 1980’s and 1990’s. The aim of this series is to highlight both known and underappreciated albums from rock, pop and metal genres from this time period through the cassette editions of their releases. Some of the albums I have known about and loved for years, while others are new to me and were music I’ve always wanted to hear. There will be some review analysis and my own personal stories about my connection with various albums. These opinions are strictly my own and do not reflect the views of anyone else at Limelight Magazine.

BONNIE TYLER – SECRET DREAMS AND FORBIDDEN FIRE (1986)

The sixth solo album from Bonnie Tyler was the follow up release to her platinum selling Faster Than The Speed Of Night release that featured her mega-hit “Total Eclipse of the Heart”. Like many, this is pretty much the main connection I ever had with Tyler’s music. Yes, there’s one other song of hers that I remember, but essentially it was all about “Total Eclipse of the Heart”. As with the Faster album, this release was produced by Jim Steinman (best known for his work with Meatloaf). Unfortunately for both Tyler and Steinman, this album wasn’t the commercial hit they probably hoped for. Instead, it actually became the last Tyler album to make any kind of dent in the US and the reviews were apparently mixed at best.

After listening to the album, I can kind of see why it turned out this way. There’s an undeniable sense of time and place given the production of the music. At first, I was kind of annoyed by just how dated the music sounded. I liked some stuff, but it was like Steinman and company couldn’t resist the urge to toss in flourishes that failed to enhance the songs at all.

It’s kind of a sad thing too. I know that there was a certain way the pop/rock music of the 1980’s was “supposed” to sound but I think if at least some of the songs on this album hadn’t been buried underneath all the studio wizardry, opinions might’ve been different.

The makeup of the album depended on the format you chose to listen to. The vinyl release had just eight songs, the CD had one bonus track. But with the cassette version of the album, there were two bonus tracks to go along with the original eight tracks.

The album did have a big hit in “Holding Out For A Hero” but technically that came two years before the release of the album. The song was used for the soundtrack to the movie Footloose, which is where it became a hit. It’s the only other song I really ever remember hearing from Tyler. It closes out the second half of the album and remains a song that I find hard to resist the urge to hum along to it.

But what about the rest of the songs? Well, it is a bit hit and miss but I think there are a number of songs that might be better than people thought back then. The first side of the album opens with “Ravishing” which has a catchy musical sound but the decision to make Tyler’s endearingly husky vocals sound as if they were recorded inside of an echo chamber kind of killed the momentum.

I will say that the song “If You Were A Woman (And I Was A Man)” fared better than I thought it would. Decidedly uptempo, it had a nice pop sensibility to it. So did “No Way To Treat A Lady”.

As for “Loving You’s A Dirty Job But Somebody’s Gotta Do It”, it’s an intriguing mix. The track is a duet with Todd Rundgren and at first the song was overly sappy. You’d need to check your blood sugar levels for the beginning of the song. But I was kind of surprised that the song began to grow on me as it progressed. The performances left sappy behind and grew more intense. It developed somewhat of an edge to it and ended up being far more enjoyable than I would’ve ever given it credit for considering how it started off.

The first of the two bonus tracks on the cassette was the song “Before This Night Is Through”. It closes out the first side and is a ballad thought a bit faster in the performance than is standard. Unfortunately, that’s about all I can really say about it as it wasn’t much more than a trifle.

The second side of the album opens with a cover of the hit song “Band of Gold”. That song was first recorded by Freda Payne but unlike the original version, Tyler’s version didn’t become a hit single. The song moves pretty quickly but other than having familiarity with the song, I didn’t really think much of this version. I could say the same about the song “Lovers Again”. The ballad is backed with a slight musical score but is just flat.

The song “Under Suspicion” is the second of the two bonus tracks and the slightly hushed performance gives the song an air of mystery to it musically. I really got into the song as a whole. As for the song “Rebel Without A Clue”, the most straight up rocker on the album, things started off great. I found myself immersed in the song. But the song is over eight minutes long and features a long instrumental outro that makes the track feel as if it is meandering along trying to find an end to itself. If they’d cut at least a couple of minutes from the song’s running time, I’d be talking more positively about it for sure.

I can’t say that critics back in the mid-80’s were completely wrong to dump all over Secret Dreams and Forbidden Fire for the inability to resist the more pompous aspects of the decade’s pop music indulgences. However, there are certain tracks that are way better than they were ever given credit for. For me, that makes the album an interesting one to take a look back on. I get to discover more about an artist that I never really paid much attention to and realize that there was more to her than just her one big hit.

NOTES OF INTEREST: Of the ten songs on the album, Bonnie Tyler had just a sole co-writing credit on the song “Under Suspicion”. Meanwhile, Jim Steinman wrote or co-wrote four songs. Noted 80’s pop writer Desmond Child wrote “Lovers Again” and “If You Were A Woman (And I Was A Man)”. Bryan Adams and Jim Vallance wrote “No Way To Treat A Lady”.

Roy Bittan and Max Weinberg from The E Street Band were some of the featured players who recorded the music for the album.

 

Jethro Tull’s Martin Barre to peform at Narrows Center

Martin Barre, legendary guitarist for Jethro Tull, returns to the Narrows Center in Fall River, Mass., on June 23, 2019, at 8 p.m. The concert will feature Martin Barre’s stellar band performing Jethro Tull classics, such as “Locomotive Breath” and “Aqualung,” and many deep tracks. Purchase tickets HERE.

Barre’s sound and playing have been a major factor in Jethro Tull’s success. Album sales have exceeded 60 million units and they continue to be played worldwide, representing an important part of classic rock history.

Barre’s guitar playing has earned him a high level of respect and recognition. He was voted 25th best solo ever in the USA and 20th best solo ever in the UK for his playing on “Aqualung.” His playing on the album Crest of a Knave earned him a Grammy award in 1988. He also influenced such contemporary guitarists as Joe Bonamassa, Steve Vai, Joe Satrini and Eric Johnson.

As well as numerous Jethro Tull albums, Barre has worked with many other artists including Paul McCartney, Phil Collins, Gary Moore, and Chris Thompson and has shared the stage with such legends as Jimmy Hendrix, Fleetwood Mac, Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin.

In 2015, Barre put together a band to play the “classic” music from the Tull catalogue.  His band is a total commitment to give Tull fans and a broader audience the chance to hear tracks not performed for many years.

The Narrows Center is located at 16 Anawan Street. Tickets to his show can be purchase online HERE or by calling the box office at 508-324-1926. For those wanting to purchase tickets in person, box office hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 noon to 5 p.m.

Photo - Martin Barre CC
Martin Barre (of Jethro Tull)

Music and entertainment coverage since October 2006!