All posts by limelightmagazine

The Cassette Chronicles – Princess Pang’s self-titled debut

BY JAY ROBERTS

The Cassette Chronicles is a continuing series of mini reviews and reflections on albums from the 1980’s and 1990’s. The aim of this series is to highlight both known and underappreciated albums from rock, pop and metal genres from this time period through the cassette editions of their releases. Some of the albums I have known about and loved for years, while others are new to me and were music I’ve always wanted to hear. There will be some review analysis and my own personal stories about my connection with various albums. These opinions are strictly my own and do not reflect the views of anyone else at Limelight Magazine.

ADVERTISEMENT – Hookers & Blow will perform at The Vault at Greasy Luck Brewpub, located at 791 Purchase Street in New Bedford, MA, on Saturday, January 20, 2018. Click on the above ad to purchase tickets!

PRINCESS PANG – PRINCESS PANG (1989)

Formed in Sweden but mostly identified as an American band, Princess Pang is one of the more obscure late 80’s rock bands I can think of. The reasons for this is that they released just this one album and it went absolutely nowhere. They got some recognition for the album’s lead track, “Trouble In Paradise”, but if you look online there’s not a whole lot of talk about the band and they aren’t even listed as having so much as a Wikipedia page.

And while I find that a gigantic shame now, I guess you could say that I was part of the problem back then. I absolutely loved the “Trouble In Paradise” song. The video was good and singer Jeni Foster had that whiskey soaked bluesy sound to her vocals. But when I originally bought this album, I really didn’t get into the rest of the songs and ended up letting the band just slip away from my conscious thought.

I had the cassette in my collection for years but it had disappeared through loss or destruction. That didn’t stop me from remembering the band though and when I got this new to me cassette version, I knew that I had to give it another shot. And I’m glad that I did, because upon reflection, this album actually rocks!

Though there are the expected trappings of the glam metal sound, the music is definitely slanted more towards that bluesy hard rock that I love so much. While Foster’s vocals are the primary selling point for me, the guitar work from Jay Lewis and Andy Tjernon is pretty exhilarating when the band kicks off the more electrically charged rockers in their repertoire.

As I said, “Trouble In Paradise” was the lead single and opening track on the album. The way Foster’s voice cuts through and captures your ear on this song is intriguing. She takes no prisoners. I remember just loving the way her vocal sounded on the opening two lines of lyrics, “Caught me downtown / on the southside of Holy Joe’s place”. I know that it is a simple little lyric but I was hooked on the song right then and there. It’s a no-holds-barred rock and roll stomp kind of a song.

The rest of the side one of the album is actually quite rocking with the exception of “Find My Heart A Home”. This song was written by Foster alone (she at least co-wrote every track on the album) and brings you down from the immediate musical high of the first song with a more mid-tempo track. It’s decent enough, but not a song I really got into as much as the rest.

I loved the solo on “South St. Kids” and “Sympathy” was another shot of adrenaline, but I think the other stand out song has to be “No Reason To Cry”. Leaning into that bluesy driven sound I mentioned, this song has a bar room boogie kind of feel that will leave you wondering if you are in the midst of some honkytonk bar. It really did a number on me when I heard it again.

Side two has six tracks and again shows the band in its more fiery rocking state. The only bump in the road for me was “Baby Blue”. The song is a ballad with the pace ticking upwards during the chorus, but it just didn’t do a thing for me.

Otherwise, the band unleashes one salvo after another. “Too Much Too Soon” plays out as a cautionary tale and has a big edgy vibe in the chorus. “China Doll” and “Scream & Shout” get your heart rate up and “I’m Not Playin” brings the house (and album) down with a crescendo of rocking pyrotechnics.

The album was released by Metal Blade Records, which in hindsight seems kind of odd given that the label is generally associated with heavier sounding music. But looking back, they got it right by getting the Princess Pang album on the shelves. It is more of an indictment on music fans (myself included from back then) that it ended up being criminally ignored.

The band may be long gone and sadly barely remembered but this album is a fine testimonial to their talent, even if it has gone unrecognized for so long.

NOTE OF INTEREST: The album is nearly impossible to find on CD. Or rather to find an affordable copy. Looking on eBay, the rare listing for a CD copy has always been expensive. I’ve actually messaged British reissue label Rock Candy Records a few times suggesting they look into giving this album a place in their release schedule. Naturally, I’m still waiting for a response.

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Hookers & Blow ft. GNR’s Dizzy Reed at Greasy Luck Brewpub on Jan. 20th

Hookers & Blow, the band led by Guns N’ Roses keyboardist Dizzy Reed and Quiet Riot guitarist Alex Grossi, will perform at The Vault at Greasy Luck Brewpub, located at 791 Purchase Street in New Bedford, MA, this Saturday, January 20, 2018. The band also features Johnny Kelly of Type O Negative/Danzig/Silvertomb and Chip Znuff’s of Enuff Z’Nuff.

The All-Star band will perform GNR hits, covers and other rock classics. Shout at the Devil, a tribute to Motley Crue, will open the show. That Metal Shows’ Don Jamieson will host the event and provide comic relief.

Tickets are only $17 and can be purchased HERE.

For those wishing to meet the band, you can purchase a $50 VIP Meet & Greet ticket in addition to the general admission ticket. You’ll get autographs from and photos with the full band! Click HERE to purchase VIP Meet & Greet tickets.

For more details about the show, click HERE.

The Cassette Chronicles – BulletBoys ‘Freakshow’

By JAY ROBERTS

The Cassette Chronicles is a continuing series of mini reviews and reflections on albums from the 1980’s and 1990’s. The aim of this series is to highlight both known and underappreciated albums from rock, pop and metal genres from this time period through the cassette editions of their releases. Some of the albums I have known about and loved for years, while others are new to me and were music I’ve always wanted to hear. There will be some review analysis and my own personal stories about my connection with various albums. These opinions are strictly my own and do not reflect the views of anyone else at Limelight Magazine.

BULLETBOYS – FREAKSHOW (1991)

It’s time for another musical true confession. I’m not really much of a BulletBoys fan. Oh sure, I liked “Smooth Up In Ya” from their self-titled album and I suppose the second single from that album, the cover of The O’Jays song “For The Love of Money” is okay. But if honesty is indeed the best policy, I couldn’t really tell you anything about the rest of that first album. I’m not even sure that I ever owned it.

So, I think it is of little surprise to anyone reading that I never bothered with album #2 Freakshow. For better or worse, BulletBoys just had nothing that kept me coming back for a second dose, so now I come at Freakshow as if it is a brand new release.

I will say that the cover art and liner notes are visually striking. As for the music, there are 12 songs on the album. Unfortunately, I think the fact that I really don’t like Marq Torien’s voice really affected me from truly getting into any of the songs.

The band released three songs from the album as singles and two of them were cover songs. The first of the covers is “Hang On St. Christopher” from Tom Waits which did nothing for me at all. I do have to admit, however, that I did kind of like “Talk To Your Daughter” which was done by bluesman J.B. Lenoir. Even Torien’s grating vocals couldn’t mess that song up entirely.

As for the rest of side one of the album, it was an exercise in restraint. By that I mean, I had to restrain myself from shutting the album off and forgetting about doing this article.

Side 2 of the album started off interestingly enough with the song “Goodgirl”. It had a pretty interesting musical backing, particularly with Mick Sweda’s guitars. I didn’t much care for “Do Me Raw” though.

If I could listen to just the music, I think I would be raving about “Ripping Me”, a fast-paced rocker that has a real good sense of intensity to it. But the vocals are just crap. I do have to give Torien some credit though. I think he did a really good job with “Say Your Prayers” and “O Me O My.” The songs rock and the vocals really do fit themselves well to each track.

In the end, this album kind of illustrates the end times of the 80’s metal years. There’s some interesting stuff scattered about the album but not really a lot and it usually feels like you’ve heard it a million times before…and done better, a lot better.

NOTE OF INTEREST: Freakshow was reissued on CD in 2005 by Wounded Bird Records. The band’s third album, Za-Za, was included on the same disc.

Marq Torien is still fronting the band today but with none of the other original members involved.

JKB Entertainment Group/Limelight Magazine Policy on Opening Acts

JKB Entertainment Group, the publisher of Limelight Magazine, is committed to bringing the best entertainment to New England. Since we started booking shows, our number one commitment has always been to our ticket buyers and fans of the artists we book. We are grateful for your support and appreciate the number of sold out shows we have had over the years.

When we book a national touring act, we have found that most fans prefer “an evening with” the artist because this enables them to perform a longer set for the duration of the evening and, in some cases, gives them more time to hold a post-show meet and greet. This is the reason why most of our shows are “an evening with” and do not have a support act on the bill.

Many of us have been to shows where we purchased a ticket to see a national touring act, but on the day of the show, three, four or even five support acts have been added to the bill with little advance notice. The show starts at 8 PM but the headliner doesn’t come on until 11 PM or later and is sometimes forced to play a shorter set due to curfew regulations. While this helps the venue’s bar tab, it doesn’t benefit the fan or any of the other acts on the bill. We have found this model sometimes discourages fans of the main artist from even purchasing a ticket, especially when the show falls on a work night. This is why JKB Entertainment Group will not book this type of show with any national touring act unless it’s part of a package tour or festival. We have been thanked by fans and many bands for taking this approach.

(Please note that this discussion only pertains to our booking of national touring acts. We have no issue with local music showcases, multiple bands performing at charity events, or venues who host local music nights with several acts as long as the shows are billed as such).

Since most our shows are “an evening with,” we do not need a support act for them. Yet, we get inundated with requests to open for these shows. Even when the artist is bringing their own opening act, we still get requests to be added to the bill. While we try to respond to everyone, we’ve decided to establish a policy on opening acts and answer any common questions we receive here. Please read this before submitting a request to open for a particular band as this will likely give you an idea if you will be considered. Moving forward, a link to this article will also be sent as our official response to anyone requesting to open a show.

As an independent concert promoter, a lot goes into booking an artist. We’re responsible for paying the artist fee, rent to the venue, hospitality (i.e. food and lodging), credit card fees, and sometimes backline, transportation, and other expenses. This is all budgeted before the artist is booked, contracts are signed, and is reflected in the ticket price. Since we sellout most of our shows, we generally don’t budget for an opening act unless that’s been negotiated with the artist in advance. If the show is billed as “an evening with” this means that either the artist or JKB Entertainment Group has specifically requested this and no requests to open the show will be considered. If the artist is not bringing their own opener and wants one for their show, we will always go with a local one and solicit requests on our social media pages. (Hint: You will not see the post if you don’t already “like” our social media pages. Click HERE to like JKB Entertainment Group and HERE to like Limelight Magazine). Local also means that you’re a band or musician from any of the six New England states and no where else.

Furthermore, here are a few other things to consider:

  • JKB Entertainment Group no longer books opening acts on Sunday, Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday nights unless the artist is bringing their own. If we book a show on these days, it’s a work night for most of our ticket buyers and they generally want to be home at a reasonable hour.
  • For shows on Thursday, Friday or Saturday nights, we never consider more than one opening act. Our patrons are paying to see the headliner and anything more than that will cut into the artists playing time.
  • The size of the venue’s stage also impacts whether we have an opening act and the type of performance it can be. Often a band will set up their gear and there is simply no room for anything else on stage. In these cases, solo acoustic openers will only be considered.

Lastly, all opening acts must be given final approval by the headliner’s booking agent AND management. If you don’t have a website, Facebook artist page, live YouTube links, professional photos, and original music, you will not be considered. If chosen, the opening act will NEVER be asked to pre-sell tickets as that’s disrespectful to the artist. However, you will be expected to actively promote the show on your social media pages, website, etc.

Another take – Michael Ryan’s top 10 concerts of 2017

By MICHAEL RYAN (Special to Limelight Magazine)

While Limelight Magazine posted it’s top 10 concerts of 2017 last week, we asked one of our readers, Michael Ryan, to offer his 10 top shows as well. Interestingly, our number one show (Roger Waters at TD Garden) was the same. Here’s his list and a short reflection about each concert.

Here’s my Top Ten list of concerts I saw in 2017. The list is obviously subjective. Certainly, seat location matters. The show’s “uniqueness” can also come into play. Both YES and Carl Palmer are always going to be a great shows, but both acts tour almost every year. That’s a good thing, though it does make the gig lose a little luster; while an act that doesn’t tour often (like John McLaughlin) adds a special aspect to the show. And sometimes, it comes down to just how much fun I had (and it doesn’t hurt if the show was free!). And if I saw a band multiple times, only one show gets ‘ranked’. That being said:

10) Matthew Sweet @ The Narrows Center (in Fall River, MA)  /// My first time seeing Matthew Sweet. His CD Girlfriend from the early ’90s is a classic and he played about half dozen songs from it.

9) Keller Williams @ The Wheel House (in Galilee, RI) /// A “surprise” appearance on the list; haven’t seen him since the days I went to hippie jam festivals. He does a lot of live phrase looping with multiple instruments, so he’s like a one-man jam-band. His music is quirky, cerebral, tongue in cheek, and energetic.

8) YES (with Carl Palmer’s ELP Legacy & Todd Rundgren) @ Foxwoods Grand Theatre /// YES used to always take the number 1 slot on these lists; but YES isn’t really YES anymore. Steve Howe is still my favorite guitarist. But other than Howe and Alan White on drums (who has lost his “snap” in my opinion), no one else is left from the “classic” YES line up of the 70’s. Carl Palmer opened; but with the bands, his set was limited to just 30 minutes (a great 30 minutes, but kind of a “tease”). Todd Rundgren’s set was disappointing (song selection; he played very little guitar, it was more of a pop-dance set). Still … any night seeing YES is a great night.

YES (PHOTO BY MICHAEL RYAN)

7) Brand X @ The Regent Theatre (in Arlington, MA) /// Brand X was a leader in the jazz-rock fusion movement in the mid to late 70’s. Two sets; roughly two hours of great jams and I won the tickets in a Limelight Magazine/JKB Entertainment Group Facebook contest! Thanks guys!

6) Denny Laine @ The Regent Theatre /// Denny was an original member of The Moody Blues, but he’s known more for joining Paul McCartney after The Beatles broke up and being part of Wings. Most of the show was “Paul – Wings material,” including the entire Band on the Run album. Fun night in a front row seat seeing music that I love!

Denny Laine (PHOTO BY MICHAEL RYAN)

5) Robby Krieger (of The Doors) @ The Bull Run (in Shirley, MA) /// Excellent show! Basically a Door’s greatest hits set list. Front seat at a front center table; had a few “fist bumps” with Robbie after songs .

Robby Krieger (PHOTO BY MICHAEL RYAN)

4) Ann Wilson (of Heart) @ The Park Theatre (in Cranston, RI) /// Awesome show and what I liked most was the set list. Obviously, there were Heart songs (“Barracuda,” “Crazy On You,” “What About Love”) and a few songs from her solo catalogue. But the song selection was mainly covers and some great covers! Three WHO songs; the show started with “The Real Me.” In the second set they played “Love, Reign O’re Me” (another song from Quadrophenia), and later played “Won’t Get Fooled Again.” I don’t recall the entire set list, but the show included “Manic Depression” (Jimi Hendrix), “She Talks to Angels” (The Black Crowes), “One Night” (Elvis Presley), “We Gotta Get Out of This Place” (The Animals), “For What it’s Worth” (Buffalo Springfield), and “I Put a Spell on You” (a song I first heard by Credence Clearwater Revival, but is a blues classic from Screamin’ Jay Hawkins). But the highlight for me was when they played “Your Move” (YES!). It was a long show with two full sets. Won the tickets from B101.

3) Kenny Wayne Shepherd (also Robert Randolph and the Family Band) @ Bold Point Park (Blues & BBQ Festival) /// Gotta LOVE the Kenny Wayne Shepherd Band. Kenny is one of my favorite guitarists, a blues-rock guitar master. Nice long two hour set, with three songs for the encore (the last being Hendrix’s “Voodoo Child”). Great seats (5th row), perfect weather for an open air venue with views of Narragansett Bay and the Providence skyline. Kenny was the headline act for this all day event, but having Robert Randolph and the Family Band playing before Kenny was great! My first time seeing his band; real good stuff! He’s a great pedal steel guitarist. The music is diverse, with elements of funk, soul, jam, and blues. The band was real tight.

Kenny Wayne Shepherd (PHOTO BY MICHAEL RYAN)

2) John McLaughlin (with Jimmy Herring) @ The Park Theatre /// Freaking awesome! I’ve never seen John McLaughlin before and when the show was announced, I didn’t even have any of his CDs. But I knew of his reputation, and grabbed tickets the minute they went on sale (front row). John was a pioneer and a leading guitarist in the jazz and jazz-rock fusion movement, is a Grammy award winner, and can typically be found on Rolling Stone or Guitar World magazines’ “top 100 guitarists” lists. If NASA ever decides to do another “greetings from earth” thing on a long range probe and include some music, last night’s show should be included. I mean, the Voyager mission included stuff from Chuck Berry and Beethoven. Any similar mission needs to include John McLaughlin. And maybe one day, eons from now, some other species may find the probe and say “these humans are rad!” and the course of galactic history will be changed. And an incredible opening act with Jimmy Herring and his new band The Invisible Whip. And after each band did a complete set, Jimmy & his band came back out to join John and his band for another full set. Three and a half hours of pure jazz-fusion / jam band bliss!

John McLaughlin (PHOTO BY MICHAEL RYAN)

1) Roger Waters @ The TD Garden (in Boston, MA) /// OMG, great show! GREAT show! I’ve never seen Roger Waters on a solo tour and only saw Pink Floyd once (in the late 70’s). And I haven’t seen a show at TD Garden in years. I’ve been catching concerts at smaller venues and have gotten used to reasonable priced shows where even the last row is a good seat. So, its been a while since I felt the energy of a packed arena with a rock legend. The band was great and Roger’s voice was spot on. Note for note, songs sounded almost exactly like the studio versions (any difference was due to the energy of being ‘live’). The sound, the presentation … everything was “BIG.” And I loved the set list. Offhand, I can’t think of anything I wanted to hear that they didn’t play. Set list included “Breathe,” “Time,” “The Great Gig in the Sky,” “Brain Damage,” “Money,” “Us and Them,” “Another Brick in the Wall,” “Welcome to the Machine,” “Wish You Were Here,” “Dogs,” “Pigs (Three Different Ones),” “Brain Damage,” “Eclipse,” “Mother,” and “Comfortably Numb.” It was another “free show” (94 HJY and good seats too, Loge 2!)

The Cassette Chronicles – White Lion’s ‘Mane Attraction’

By JAY ROBERTS

The Cassette Chronicles is a continuing series of mini reviews and reflections on albums from the 1980’s and 1990’s that I have acquired through Purchase Street Records in New Bedford, MA.

The aim of this series is to highlight both known and underappreciated albums from rock, pop and metal genres from the 1980’s through the cassette editions of their releases. Some of the albums I have known about and loved for years, while others are new to me and were music I’ve always wanted to hear. There will be some review analysis and my own personal stories about my connection with various albums.

These opinions are strictly my own and do not reflect the views of anyone else at Limelight Magazine.

WHITE LION – MANE ATTRACTION (1991)

It seems a bit fitting that as the seal is broken on Year 2 of The Cassette Chronicles, I should be breaking open the seal on this week’s album selection.

Yes, this copy of the Mane Attraction album was never opened from its original wrapping after it was bought at a Strawberries record store. And yes, this is part of the Purchase Street 100 so it wasn’t me who never opened the album.

Like a lot of people, it was White Lion’s Pride album that got me interested in the band. It was pretty much based off of their three biggest songs “Wait”, “Tell Me” and “When The Children Cry”.

However, I went back to their Fight To Survive album after the fact and found myself enjoying the more dramatic and slightly heavier sound they had on that album to the more pop driven songs on Pride.

With all songs on the album written by Mike Tramp and guitarist Vito Bratta, there is a definite feel of the band trying to recapture the rawer sound that defined Fight To Survive. If you listen closely, you’ll hear that there is a deeper sound to Tramp’s vocals. He’s singing lower than on earlier records.

The opening intro on album opener “Lights and Thunder” had a gritty texture to it. The song is a pretty fast moving rocker with some cool guitar licks from Bratta. Adding an extra dimension to the track was the fact that it lasted over 8 minutes, which is not something you’d be expecting from White Lion. These various factors combined to make this one an unusually thrilling song for me.

They re-recorded “Broken Heart” from Fight To Survive for this album. This new version is decent enough but for my money, the original remains the best version of the song.

Bratta’s playing ends up being quite phenomenal on tracks like “Leave Me Alone”, a song with song unexpectedly darker overtones to the lyrics. The opening song on Side 2 is “Warsong” and it has some slick guitar sounds as well. It’s a straight up rocker (for the most part) that really lets the band as a whole cut loose and I really dug the song. Musically, I could say the same about “She’s Got Everything” though I did find it lyrically boring.

Though the band got overshadowed by the explosion of the mostly awful grunge movement, they did have a song that should’ve been a commercial hit during the time of its original release in “Love Don’t Come Easy”. The track has a great hook to it in both sound and a catchy chorus.

I do have to say that the more traditional slow moving ballad “You’re All I Need” ended up with me missing the boat. It just didn’t move me in the least. Also, the ballad “Till Death Do Us Part” has a great solo guitar opening the song but otherwise it is a bit run of the mill.

Of course, if you do want a really good ballad from the band, you should just wait until White Lion really hit their stride over the course of the last three songs on the album. The triumvirate of songs kicks off with “Out With The Boys” which is another damn the torpedos kind of rocker before the band shifts gears with what is their only instrumental track in the song “Blue Monday”. It won’t be much of a surprise that it is a solid bluesy number when you realize that it was a tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughn who died during the time that the band was in the studio recording the album. Now, I didn’t forget that I mentioned a ballad that you would like. While it inadvertantly serves as the band’s kind of goodbye song, “Farewell To You” is just a wonderful example of a ballad done right. It’s affecting, has a superb chorus and you can really feel the emotion coming off of Mike Tramp’s vocal. Hell, as you listen to the song you can probably imagine it playing over a montage for pretty much any TV show that is airing its final episode.

As I looked back at this album, I have to wonder why I fell out of musical love with White Lion. Because Mane Attraction really did have quite a lot going for it. Maybe it was because I was out of school and working full time that I had less time to keep up with all the music I loved. Maybe it was just pure laziness. I don’t know what the truth of the matter is regarding the situation. What I do know is that now that I have listened to the album, Mane Attraction makes a play for being exactly that…a showcase album for the band.

NOTES OF INTEREST – While bassist James Lomenzo and drummer Greg D’Angelo recorded this album, they left soon after it was released. Jimmy DeGrasso was recruited as D’Angelo’s replacement. He has played with Megadeth and Alice Cooper among his other credits.

The band called it quits after touring for this album. Their last show was in at the Channel Club in Boston, MA.

Singer Mike Tramp is a now solo artist who released a fantastic album in 2017 called Maybe Tomorrow. Meanwhile, Vito Bratta pretty much disappeared from the music world after 1992 due to family reasons.

Limelight Magazine puts music awards on ‘indefinite hiatus’

After holding eight consecutive Limelight Magazine Music Awards ceremonies, we decided to take 2017 off to self-evaluate this event. During this time, we discussed several different options and decided to put the event on indefinite hiatus because the cons outweigh the pros in hosting this event again.

As we stated last year, the Limelight Magazine Music Awards has always been a major undertaking and took a considerable amount of time to plan. It was a very successful event with increased attendance each year. The most exciting part was seeing the excitement it brought to so many local musicians, many of whom were never recognized by anyone from the New England music scene before.

Despite this fact, there was always a lot of negativity on social media that took the joy out of hosting this event each year. From being criticized for the nomination process to some musicians bad mouthing other musicians were things we never expected to see. Furthermore, it seems more readers’ polls and awards ceremonies are taking place each year and we feel there is some truth to the tongue-in-cheek bumper sticker that is sold at many record stores that says, “No More Music Award Shows.”

Lastly, we’d like to respond to some of the negative comments we received over the years. It may now seem pointless, but it may help to understand some of the reasons for our decision.

It’s a popularity contest. You should have people in the music industry make the nominations and decide the winners. (via Facebook post)

We firmly agree that every awards show is flawed. There is no perfect event because people are always involved in the process and have their own biased tastes. The Grammy’s and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, for example, are decided by industry professionals and we often hear and read about what a joke those events are. Remember Jethro Tull being nominating in the heavy metal category and winning!?! What about all the deserving acts who have been ignored for years by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame committee!?! We could go on and on, but ultimately we are proud of the process we had because it enabled many musicians to be recognized who might not ordinarily receive it.

I honestly don’t understand how disconnected an awards show can be to even let some of these bands be nominated. Some of these bands have little to no talent. This is a flat out embarrassment.  (via website comment)

You would probably say that about any local music awards ceremony. Get out to some local shows and you’d recognize some of the names on the ballot. Who knows? Maybe you’d like some of them.

I’ve been a local musician for years and that [expletive] act won over me. That band sucks. Almost everyone on the ballot sucks. (via Facebook comment)

We’re sorry you felt that way about another musician. Life isn’t fair and things like this happen all the time. At least you were recognized by your fans and made the ballot. It’s too bad you never shared the poll on your social media pages because you could have won.

The winners know in advance. I just know it! (via Facebook comment)

We still laugh about this one. The host(s) of the event didn’t even know until they received the winner’s name in a sealed envelope. If so many people knew, why were so many winners not in attendance or an acceptance speech prepared on their behalf?

OMG! You charge a $10 admission fee. That’s outrageous. (via e-mail)

Due to a lack of sponsorships (or very few of them) each year, the co-owners of Limelight Magazine funded the entire awards ceremony out of their own pockets because of their passion for music. They had to pay for rent, sound tech, online survey, awards, host stipend, marketing, credit card fees on ticket sales, and other expenses. One year the awards show generated $16 profit and that’s because our photographer and her husband bought a ticket at the door. The admission was still cheaper than a night out at the movies and you got to see seven or eight acts perform live and hang out and network with your peers.

We could respond to more comments, but this already is long enough. In closing, we’d like to congratulate all the past nominees and winners. A complete list of all the winners for over the years appears below.

8th Limelight Magazine Music Awards
@ Spire Center for Performing Arts, Plymouth, MA
Saturday, April 16, 2016

Unsung Hero Award
Shanna Jackman

Band of the Year
Flight of Fire

Live Artist of the Year
The Shana Stack Band

Album of the Year (Group)
21st Century Fugitives – Losing Time

Album of the Year (Solo Artist)
Carissa Johnson – For Now

Male Vocalist of the Year
Rob Pagnano

Female Vocalist of the Year
Amy Marie

Tribute Band of the Year
Heartbreaker – A Tribute to Led Zeppelin

Metal/Hardcore Act of the Year
Death wish

Debut Album of the Year
Matt York – Boston, Texas

Breakthrough Artist of the Year
Bad Marriage

Young Performer of the Year
Sarah Deanna

Singer/Songwriter of the Year
Michael Spaulding

Country Artist of the Year
Timmy Brown and Black Diamond

Video of the Year (Group)
Red Evans – “Baby, It’s Cold Outside”

Video of the Year (Solo)
Matthew Neves – “Today Is The Day”

Song of the Year
The Aldous Collins Band – “Bernadette”

7th Limelight Magazine Music Awards
@ Spire Center for Performing Arts, Plymouth, MA
Saturday, March 21, 2015

Legend Award
New England

Unsung Hero Award
Robin Lane

Band of the Year
The House on Cliff

Live Artist of the Year
Marianne Toilet and The Runs

Album of the Year (Group)
Dan Lawson Band – Soldiers of Fortune (tie)
The Quins – A Tale of Love and Evil (tie)

Album of the Year (Solo)
Susan Cattaneo – Haunted Heart

Male Vocalist of the Year
Walter Barlow

Female Vocalist of the Year
Jenna Lotti

Tribute Band of the Year
Beatles for Sale – Tribute to The Beatles

Metal/Hardcore Act of the Year
Along Came the Flood

Breakthrough Artist of the Year
The Dust Ruffles

Young Performer of the Year
Emily Hodges

Singer-Songwriter of the Year
Amy Fairchild

Country Artist of the Year
Shana Stack Band

Video of the Year (Group)
Singlecast – “Running to You”

Video of the Year (Solo)
Boston Catalano – “Stronger” (tie)
Joe Merrick – “Kiss Me Like It’s New Year’s Eve” (tie)

Song of the Year
The October Accord – “Better Off Without You”

6th Limelight Magazine Music Awards
@ South Shore Music, Quincy, MA
Saturday, March 22, 2014

Legend Award
Extreme

Unsung Hero Award
Ayla Brown

Service Award
Jessica Botelho

Band of the Year
Grace Morrison and the RSO

Live Artist of the Year
Bigtalkahh

Album of the Year (Group)
Beyond Blonde – Purple Rose

Album of the Year (Solo)
Jamie Lynn Hart – Live At Tupelo

Male Vocalist of the Year
Joe Merrick

Female Vocalist of the Year ​
Brianna Grace

Tribute Band of the Year
Forever Young (Neil Young)

Metal/Hardcore Act of the Year
Hellspeak

Breakthrough Artist of the Year
Closer Than We Appear

Young Performer of the Year
21st Century Fugitives

Singer/Songwriter of the Year
Krista Baroni

Country Artist of the Year
Britt Hill

Video of the Year (Group)
The Devil’s Twins – “Love and War”

Video of the Year (Solo)
Jamie Lynn Hart – “Down”

Song of the Year
Kiley Evans & Joe Merrick – “We’d Be Lying”

5th Limelight Magazine Music Awards
@ Rock Junction, Coventry, RI
Saturday, March 16, 2013

Legend Award
BOSTON

Unsung Hero Award
Lisa Guyer

DJ Most Supportive of the Local Music Scene
Lisa Azizian & John Shea

Band of the Year
Lisa Markovich & Beyond Blonde

Live Artist of the Year
Awesome Express

Album of the Year (Group)
Closer Than We Appear – Evaluating Expressions

Album of the Year (Solo)
Sarah Swain – Every Little Bird

Male Vocalist of the Year
Jesse Liam

Female Vocalist of the Year
Jessica Prouty

Tribute Band of the Year
The Great Escape: Tribute to Journey

Metal/Harcore Act of the Year
Bigtalkahh

Breakthrough Artist of the Year
popALERT

Singer/Songwriter of the Year
Amanda McCarthy

Country Artist of the Year
Ashley Jordan

Video of the Year
Krista Angelucci – “C R E E P” (tie)
Birch Hill Dam – “Fathom’s Below” (tie)

Song of the Year
“Wicked” by Sara Leketa

4th Limelight Magazine Music Awards
@ Firehouse 13, Providence, RI
Saturday, March 10, 2012

Legend Award
The Fools

DJ Most Supportive of the Local Music Scene
Cat Wilson

Band of the Year
Beautiful Tuesday (tie)
Jessica Prouty Band (tie)

Live Artist of the Year
Beautiful Tuesday

Album/EP of the Year (Group)
Lisa Markovich & Beyond Blonde – Showing My Roots

Album/EP of the Year (Solo)
Ray Cooke – Good Life

Male Vocalist of the Year
Louis St. August

Female Vocalist of the Year
Jamie Lynn Hart

Tribute Band of the Year
Aerochix – Tribute to Aerosmith

Metal/Hardcore Act of the Year
I For An Eye

New Artist of the Year
The Vinyl Grooves

Singer/Songwriter of the Year
Jamie Lynn Hart

Song of the Year
Kiley Evans – “Johnny Depp”

3rd Limelight Magazine Music Awards
@ Club Hell, Providence, RI
March 12, 2011

Legend Award
MASS

Band of the Year
Varsity Girls

Live Artist of the Year
York

Album/EP of the Year
Shryne – Here and Now

Male Vocalist of the Year
Craig DeMelo

Female Vocalist of the Year
Elle Gallo

Tribute Band of the Year
Ornament – A Tribute to Trans-Siberian Orchestra

Metal/Hardcore Act of the Year
Structure Fails

New Artist of the Year
The Alarming Sound

Song of the Year
Jessica Prouty Band – “Escape”

2nd Limelight Magazine Music Awards
@ Club Hell, Providence, RI
January 31, 2010

DJ Most Supportive of the Local Music Scene
Jim Stearns

Band of the Year
Shryne

Live Artist of the Year (Major)
Sarah Borges and the Broken Singles

Live Artist of the Year (Indie)
Route .44 (tie)
The Candace Brooks band (tie)
SexCoffee (tie)

Album of the Year (Group Major)
Joe Perry – Have Guitar Will Travel

Album of the Year (Group Indie)
The Candace Brooks Band – The Chase

Album of the Year (Solo)
Terry Kitchen – Summer to Snowflakes

Male Vocalist of the Year
Jon Brennan

Female Vocalist of the Year
Sarah Kollett

Tribute Band of the Year
Bon Jersey – A Tribute to Bon Jovi

1st Limelight Magazine Music Awards
@ Narrows Center for the Arts in Fall River, MA
January 25, 2009

Band of the Year
The Candace Brooks Band

Live Artist of the Year (Major)
MASS

Live Artist of the Year (Indie)
Shryne

Album of the Year (Group Major)
MASS – Crack of Dawn

Album of the Year (Group Indie)
Hello Mahalo – Dawning Days

Album of the Year (Solo)
Charlie Farren – Old & Young

Male Vocalist of the Year
Justin Joyce

Female Vocalist of the Year
Candace Brooks

Tribute Band of the Year
The Great Escape: Tribute to Journey

Guitarist of the Year
Joe Grananta (tie)
Jack Lynx (tie)

Bassist of the Year
Lou Spagnola

Drummer of the Year
Todd Salpietro

Keyboardist of the Year
Steve Baker