All posts by limelightmagazine

Original members of Third Eye Blind to perform at Greasy Luck on June 23

XEB, which features three original members of Third Eye Blind, will perform in The Vault at Greasy Luck in New Bedford, MA, on Saturday, June 23, 2018. The Pogs will open the show. Purchase tickets HERE.

Xeb brings together three original members of Third Eye Blind. Kevin Cadogan, Tony Fredianelli and Arion Salazar’s contributions span 17 years of the band’s history.

Cadogan, who was a signatory to Third Eye Blind’s Elektra record deal, performed lead guitar and composed the music to 10 of the 14 songs on 3eb’s 1997 self-titled debut album which went six times platinum. Cadogan also composed the music to six songs on 3eb’s double platinum selling sophomore album Blue including the fan favorite “Wounded”. Cadogan has been hailed as a master innovator by Guitar Player Magazine and toured from 1996 through 199,9 performing his co-authored radio hits “How’s It Going To Be”, “Graduate”, and “Losing A Whole Year”.

In San Francisco 1993/94, they wrote and performed under the name Third Eye Blind until Fredianelli exited the band that same year, but not before contributing musical production elements to songs on the debut such as “Motorcycle Drive By” and the hit “Semi-Charmed Life”. Fredianelli later contributed his signature backing vocals and guitar, ushering in a new sound for Third Eye Blind that carried through the fourth album. Fredianelli composed the music to many songs on the certified gold album Out Of The Vain. His co-authored radio hits include “Blinded”, “Non-Dairy Creamer” and 2009’s “Bonfire” from the #1 selling album Ursa Major.

Grammy nominated bassist and composer Arion Salazar co-wrote many songs (credited and un-credited) throughout the band’s career including the hit “Never Let You Go” along with other fan favorites spanning the bands career. Salazar is credited as a producer on Third Eye Blind’s Blue and Out Of The Vein albums and is known for his signature use of double/effected bass tracking and vintage keyboards.

Tickets are only $17 and can be purchased HERE. Tickets for reserved table seating are also available. For more details about the show, click HERE.

The Vault at Greasy Luck is located at located at 791 Purchase Street in New Bedford, MA. The venue is set within a former bank building featuring original vault doors and a truly historic feel. Patrons have raved about the superior acoustics and intimate setting.

The Cassette Chronicles – U.D.O.’s ‘Animal House’

By JAY ROBERTS

The Cassette Chronicles is a continuing series of mini reviews and reflections on albums from the 1980’s and 1990’s. The aim of this series is to highlight both known and underappreciated albums from rock, pop and metal genres from this time period through the cassette editions of their releases. Some of the albums I have known about and loved for years, while others are new to me and were music I’ve always wanted to hear. There will be some review analysis and my own personal stories about my connection with various albums. These opinions are strictly my own and do not reflect the views of anyone else at Limelight Magazine.

ADVERTISEMENT – Click on the above ad to purchase tickets to XEB in the Vault at Greasy Luck in New Bedford MA, on June 23, 2018!

U.D.O. – ANIMAL HOUSE (1987)

Normally when I choose which albums to write about in this series, I try to avoid using any particular artist in back to back weeks. This week, however, I am purposely repeating an artist choice because I have seen my admiration grow and grow for singer Udo Dirkschneider. 

I would say that a good part of that increasing admiration stems from seeing him live for the first time. He delivered such an amazing performance that it might just end up being my favorite concert of 2018.

So, when I remembered that I had a copy of the first U.D.O. album Animal House, I had thought to hold off a week. But then I said to heck with that! I didn’t want to wait to listen and write up my thoughts about the album.

This is the first “solo” album for Dirkschneider, but when I was reading the liner notes I had to wonder just how much of a solo album it really was. All the music is credited to “Accept and Deaffy” and while it doesn’t say it in the liner notes, the Wikipedia page for the album says the song “Lay Down The Law” credits its performance to Accept and U.D.O.

Don’t get me wrong, I actually quite enjoyed this album but it did strike me a bit odd for an album that was Udo’s declaration of independence after leaving (or was it a firing?) Accept that they’d write an album FOR him.

As for the music, I thought the first side of the album was a bit of a mix. The title track opens the album and a creepy opening piece is used before the song launches into a faster paced rocker. Meanwhile the song “They Want War” has a big keyboard sound as well as the use of a children and youths choir to fill out the finished product. It seemed a bit weird at first but it actually worked in the end.

Otherwise, the first side of the album rocked hard with “Go Back To Hell” and “Black Widow” then closed out with the ballad “In The Darkness”, which thankfully was pretty enjoyable.

Side two was much more of a full on metal slobberknocker. That “Lay Down The Law” song explodes in your ear like a few dozen sticks of dynamite. There’s little subtly in the title of “We Want It Loud” but that’s fine because it’s an energetically paced rocker. 

The band downshifts a little on “Warrior” but the song still manages to be rather heavy. “Coming Home” is blazing with Udo’s vocals fueling the fieryness of the song.

I really like when an album closes out with a fast-paced cut, leaving you at an adrenaline high point as it takes its leave from you. But “Run For Cover” was far slower than that. It straddles the line between a ballad feel and a more anthemic sound. I’d be lying if I told you if I was disappointed in the song as a closing track though. It actually turned out rather well.

So, while I do wonder how much of a solo album you can really call this one, Animal House was a no doubt smashing way to introduce U.D.O. upon the world. 31 years later, the band is still going strong and this album laid the foundation for all that came after it.

NOTES OF INTEREST: Guitarist Peter Szigeti and bassist Frank Rittel were only a part of the band for the Animal House album, but they each played on the first three studio albums from Warlock (Burning The Witches, Hellbound and True As Steel).

The CD edition of the album had a bonus track called “Hot Tonight”. In 2013, Animal House was among the albums given anniversary edition reissues. It included four live bonus tracks and the video for the song “Go Back To Hell”.

Robert Gordon to perform at in The Vault at Greasy Luck on June 15th

Rockabilly legend Robert Gordon will perform in The Vault at Greasy Luck in New Bedford, MA, on Friday, June 15, 2018. Johnny Barnes & The NightCrawlers will open the show. Purchase tickets HERE.

From his NYC punk rock days fronting the Tuff Darts in 1976, to his days on RCA Records, neo-rockabilly singer Robert Gordon has always had music on his mind and in his sights.

Gordon, who recorded for the great RCA Victor label, has appeared on many television shows around the world including: The Conan Obrien Show, Late Night With David Letterman, Second City TV, Don Kirshner’s Rock Concert, The Old Grey Whistle Test (U.K. television), Live from the Bottom Line (Japanese television), D.O.C. (Italian television), Top Pop (Dutch television), Musikladen (German TV) and a TV commercial for Budweiser Beer. His music has been used in major motions picture soundtracks like Oliver Stone’s Natural Born Killers and The Loveless, which Gordon had a co-starring role with Willem Defoe.

Gordon’s hits include the Bruce Springsteen song “Fire” which was written for Elvis Presley and includes Springsteen playing keyboards on the track. Additional hits include “Red Hot”, “The Way I Walk”, “Rockabilly Boogie”, and “Someday, Someway.” Gordon has recorded and toured with some of the most respected musicians of the last 25 years, including Bruce Springsteen, Anton Fig, Paul Shaffer, Link Wray, Chris Spedding, Danny Gatton, and Eddie Angel.

Tickets are only $20 and can be purchased HERE. Tickets will also be available at the door for $25.  Tickets for reserved table seating are also available. For more details about the show, click HERE.

The Vault at Greasy Luck is located at located at 791 Purchase Street in New Bedford, MA. The venue is set within a former bank building featuring original vault doors and a truly historic feel. Patrons have raved about the superior acoustics and intimate setting.

The Cassette Chronicles – U.D.O.’s ‘Faceless World’

By JAY ROBERTS

The Cassette Chronicles is a continuing series of mini reviews and reflections on albums from the 1980’s and 1990’s. The aim of this series is to highlight both known and underappreciated albums from rock, pop and metal genres from this time period through the cassette editions of their releases. Some of the albums I have known about and loved for years, while others are new to me and were music I’ve always wanted to hear. There will be some review analysis and my own personal stories about my connection with various albums. These opinions are strictly my own and do not reflect the views of anyone else at Limelight Magazine.

ADVERTISEMENT – Click on the above ad to purchase tickets!

U.D.O. – FACELESS WORLD (1990)

It’s a funny thing to me that despite the fact that I’m a really big fan of Udo Dirkschneider’s solo band U.D.O., I never once bothered to pick up one of their albums until 2004’s Thunderball which was the band’s 9th studio release.

Earlier this year, I was able to see the Dirkschneider band live in concert. It’s basically the U.D.O. lineup but they played an entire set of songs from Udo’s time in the band Accept. This was due to it being a two year world tour where he was playing the songs live for the last time before retiring them from his set list.

The show was simply freaking amazing and while I’ve picked up all the albums post-Thunderball, it lit a fire under me to go back and get the earlier material as well. I grabbed four CDs from the merchandise table at the show, but I also had picked up the cassette edition of this album, the band’s 3rd studio release, on one of my music buying excursions.

The first thing I noted upon listening to Faceless World is that the material has a much more considered and measured feel to it. According the Wikipedia post about the album, it has far lighter feel than the two albums that preceded it or any of the ones that came after it. At times, it feels more like a rock and roll album that one of the band’s more go-for-broke metal offerings.

In fact, I’d be hard pressed to call “Trip To Nowhere” anything other than a straightforward rock and roll song. Yes, there’s more of an edge to it because of Udo’s instantly identifiable vocal style but there’s really not a whole lot of metal aggression to the track. However, you will find that whether rock or metal, it is a very cool sounding song. I found that “Restricted Area”, while a fast moving rocker, also had a strong rhythmic feel to it as well.

The album opening “Heart of Gold” is a decent track but the way the vocals alternate within each verse from soft to hard felt a bit weird. Luckily, the song’s chorus was really good and helped give an overall lift to cut. Speaking of songs with stand out choruses, “Blitz of Lightning” has a very lyrically impressive one.

For the majority of the material on Faceless World, the songs range from mid-to-uptempo with a few songs really earning more of a sense of the all out aggression metal feel. But as is the case, there’s always a ballad track. Unfortunately, “Unspoken Words” was more than a bit hard to get into. There’s been a number of strong ballads in the course of the U.D.O. discography but this one pales in comparison. Also, the title track…totally flat and lifeless!

Of course, if you want to really stick your head into the speakers to make your ears explode with metal goodness, you would need to do it on the songs “Born To Run” and “Can’t Get Enough”. Both are intense pieces of music with the latter song being the most fiery example of pure metal. Lyrically strong, each of them is just over three minutes long. They get in, rock you into next week, and then blaze their way out again.

I’d have to say that I liked this album overall, despite the seeming attempt to be more reined in with the songwriting. There’s only a couple of down tracks out of the 12 on the cassette and honestly, it’s extremely hard to go wrong with any of the music that features the inimitable Udo Dirkschneider.

NOTES OF INTEREST: There was an anniversary edition of the album released on CD in 2013 that included two live bonus tracks and the video for “Heart of Gold”.

Zoso and Completely Unchained to perform in The Vault at Greasy Luck in June

Paying tribute to two of rocks greatest bands, Zoso – A Tribute to Led Zeppelin and Completely Unchained – A Tribute to Van Halen, will perform in The Vault at Greasy Luck in New Bedford, MA, on June 1st and June 8th respectively.

Zoso – The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience was formed in 1995 to perform the most accurate and captivating Led Zeppelin experience since the real thing. For Zoso, it’s much more than just being a tribute. It’s about touching a golden era in music. Zoso embodies Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Bonham and John Paul Jones in their spirit, tightly-wound talent and authenticity.

Each band member has been carefully selected to portray both the appearance and playing styles of their Led Zeppelin counterparts. In 23 successful years of touring, they have perfected their art. As one of the longest tenured Zeppelin tributes, Zoso’s 2,400 live shows around the world have established them as the most traveled and successful band in the market.

Zoso’s live shows are not about simply playing the right notes, they are about aura and feeling, harkening back to the unique atmosphere Led Zeppelin created. It’s in the way they play: Each band member’s mastery of authentic vintage instruments coupled with spot-on vocals, guitar, bass, drums, and keyboards, their compelling stage persona and distinct Led Zeppelin sound, with astounding visual imagery recreates the music, magic, and mystery of a Zeppelin concert. The impact is so powerful that band members constantly hear from young rockers that they were the catalyst behind turning them into new, die-hard Zeppelin fans.

Advance tickets for Zoso are $15 and will be available at the door for $20. Tickets for reserved table seating are $30. To purchase tickets, click HERE. For more information about the show, including set times, click HERE.

Meanwhile, on the following Friday, June 8th, Completely Unchained – The Ultimate Tribute to the mighty Van Halen re-create the ultimate Van Halen production – the attitude, sounds, excitement, energy and most of all the fun that Van Halen produced as one of the best rock bands in the world. Starting off by reproducing the very best of the original line up, then merging the “Van Hagar” era with some David Lee Roth solo hits, completes a whole catalog of the greatest hard rock songs ever recorded. Back in the Day open the show.

Advance tickets for Completely Unchained are $12 and will also be available at the door. Tickets for reserved table seating are $20. To purchase tickets, click HERE. For more information about the show, including set times, click HERE.

The Vault at Greasy Luck is located at located at 791 Purchase Street in New Bedford, MA. The venue is set within a former bank building featuring original vault doors and a truly historic feel. Patrons have raved about the superior acoustics and intimate setting.

 

Reflection on the closing of the Cable Car Cinema and Cafe

With the closing of the Cable Car Cinema and Cafe in Providence, R.I., after 42 years, we had planned to write an editorial about it. We have so many memories of going there. In fact, the past couple of years the owners really raised the bar with their programming. We also featured them in Limelight Magazine two years ago when the indie cinema celebrated their 40th anniversary. (Click HERE to read the story). However, we noticed a post on Sara Archambault’s Facebook page that expressed our thoughts exactly.  Instead of rewriting essentially what she posted, we asked for her permission to share this on our page with our readers and she graciously accepted. So long, Cable Car Cinema and Cafe. You were a gem in the Providence community and a cultural institution!

To Whom It May Concern:

As a filmmaker, an arts sector worker, and a life-long RI resident (with about 20 years in Providence), I want to add a line to the recent debates about the closing of the Cable Car Cinema.

I am fortunate to work at a regional arts funding organization called the LEF Foundation. LEF supports documentary filmmakers who reside in New England but make films around the world. Each year, we gather a jury of film professionals from all over the country to make the grant decisions and in the last few years, we have moved these deliberations from where the foundation is centered, in Harvard Square, to Providence.

I helped to orchestrate this move. I have what is possibly an absurd amount of Providence Pride. I revel in showing off this city’s historic and crafty features. I love the people here; our DIY spirit; the fierce call to create and forge our own paths with nothing but some good ideas and a little sweat. You can see this manifested all over the city in myriad ways.

In the mornings, I walk the jury from where they stay at the Dean Hotel over to Small Point Café for breakfast. At the end of the day, I bring them out to see art or shop some craft stores after a hard day’s work.

Significantly, I always send this jury to the Cable Car, one of this city’s most important cultural institutions. This is a place dedicated to showing the best of independent film, and intentionally building community around cinema. After a day of watching emerging films in progress, it’s satisfying to send the jury to the “cinema with couches” to see what one of these films might look like when it reaches the big screen.

But this year was different.

I knew I was sending this group of film industry leaders to the Cable Car for the last time, and I was heartbroken.

But it’s not only the Cable Car closing that pains my heart. Walking down Westminster, the jury encountered closed storefronts on each block. Every new construction boasted signs for hotels or luxury apartments. But what is it that will draw people to our city? Or make them stay? I’m heartened by the cool little shops and restaurants I see sprouting up downtown, but I worry the new construction signals a stripping away of this city’s beating heart.

Why am I so worried? Until recently, the LEF Foundation was located in Harvard Square, where it had been since 1992. I witnessed the Square morph from a funky, eclectic space to a corporate white wash of familiar franchises. The building LEF was in for more than 25 years was sold and the rent doubled. Down the block the Brattle Theatre, an independent cinema, is a remnant of what the Square once was. It’s all the more treasured for this reason but it too has a wealthy landlord–Harvard University–and ongoing challenges remain.

What I saw happen in Harvard Square, I see happening here.

And so I ask: What do we value, Providence? What do we want this place to be?

Providence is well known around the world for its arts scene. The culture of this place is directly tied to its creative character. Anchors like AS220, Trinity Rep, and PPAC, helped spur this growth we see. Places like the Cable Car, Craftland, Thee Red Fez, the Columbus Theater, Haven Brothers, Armageddon Shop, the Dirt Palace, and Frog N Toad, to just mention a handful, are what give Providence its flavor. Our success as a place is, was and will always be tied to the fates of the determined artists, storytellers, and entrepreneurs who bring our city its cultural life.

RI artist Hilary Treadwell (now famous for her “Don’t Mess with RI Either” t-shirts) was quoted in local media when there was speculation that the Crook Point Bascule Bridge was to be taken down. She said, “The soul of a place is diminished when we dismantle its strange things.”

In our city’s pursuit of growth, I fear we may be dismantling our strange things. And it is, indeed, these same strange things that provide the bedrock to why people want to come here in the first place. What is the vision for nurturing and protecting the local while planning for this growth?

In the case of the Cable Car, it is important to note that one of the largest arts institutions in our city took a primary role in the elimination of one of the smallest. RISD receives tax benefits from our city. What is their commitment to being a community partner?

On the state level, instead of giant tax breaks for one or two large corporations, what about incentives for 40 small businesses? What can we do to help grow the Cable Cars – people committed to this city, with roots here – into mid-size or large businesses with more jobs? Where is that vision for advancement? Finally, how can the giant behemoths of the universities create meaningful partnerships with the business and cultural sector that service a more useful set of values than an asset on a spreadsheet?

What do we want to be, Providence?

I am inviting those of us who are so lucky to live in this wonderful little city to think creatively and challenge our leaders to think with us. Think of sitting on those comfy couches discovering a new movie or maybe going on a first date. What does Providence become without the Cable Cars?

I will mourn the loss of this theater for a long time. I wish the owners (my friends – full transparency) well and I hope they find it within them to recreate somewhere else in town.

Finally, I implore our city, state and institutional leaders, please don’t dismantle our strange things in the pursuit of profit and growth. They are the very pillars that hold us up. Including you.

Respectfully submitted, 
Sara Archambault

The logo of the Cable Car Cinema and Cafe in Providence, R.I. 

The Cassette Chronicles – Vicious Rumors’ ‘Welcome to the Ball’

By JAY ROBERTS

The Cassette Chronicles is a continuing series of mini reviews and reflections on albums from the 1980’s and 1990’s. The aim of this series is to highlight both known and underappreciated albums from rock, pop and metal genres from this time period through the cassette editions of their releases. Some of the albums I have known about and loved for years, while others are new to me and were music I’ve always wanted to hear. There will be some review analysis and my own personal stories about my connection with various albums. These opinions are strictly my own and do not reflect the views of anyone else at Limelight Magazine.

ADVERTISEMENT – Click on the above ad to purchase tickets to Unchained – The Ultimate Tribute to Van Halen in the Vaul at Greasy Luck in New Bedford, MA, on June 8th.

VICIOUS RUMORS – WELCOME TO THE BALL (1991)

You know how there are those bands that you’ve always been aware of, but never actually listened to any of their music? Well, let me introduce you to one of those bands on my list…Vicious Rumors.

As embarrassing as it is to think about considering their metal bonafides over the years, I’ve never gotten around to checking out anything the band had recorded. So when Welcome To The Ball dropped into my lap from the box of cassettes I have waiting to be listened to and written about, I figured it was about darn time I changed the band’s status with me.

This was the band’s fourth album and much like the ones that came before this is mostly burn your house down fast paced heavy metal. Musically the album is pretty interesting. Guitarists Geoff Thorpe and Mark McGee burn up their fretboards one every song. Both men co-wrote all the songs, in varying combinations, with singer Carl Albert and there is a definite sense of cohesion to the 11 tracks on the album.

While fiery guitar licks and a thumping rhythm from bassist David Starr and drummer Larry Howe cry out from each song, there’s many a varying style within that framework so that there isn’t a feeling of sameness to the material.

I was keenly interested in hearing the vocal work from Carl Albert, but things did not get off to a good start for me on that front. The effects employed on his vocal track for the opening song “Abandoned” was rather off-putting. That was quickly offset with the very next song, “You Only Live Twice”, which was far more straightforward (if even more aggressively paced) and that includes how the vocals were streamlined into the song.

The band did get a little topical in their lyrical subject matter on the first side of the album with both “Savior From Anger” and “Children”. They managed to go even further with that on Side Two’s “Mastermind” which manages to still resonate today, lyrically speaking, as it rails against the increased computerization in our daily lives.

Side one closes out with “Dust To Dust”, another fast paced rocker complete with a draw you in chorus. Albert’s vocal is impeccably delivered here.

The second half of the album has a couple of problematic songs in the aforementioned “Mastermind” and “Raise Your Hands”. Both tracks have their moments, but get otherwise ruined by ineffectual chorus that are just criminally lame in both construction and delivery.

But it wasn’t all for naught because the darkly twisted “Six Stepsisters” flows spectacularly well. It’s definitely a killer song that somehow manages to make me smile despite its thematic darkness.

The album closes with a crushing blaze of glory in “Ends Of The Earth” but the biggest surprise for me on Welcome To The Ball was the band’s one moment of stepping on the brake. What can only be referred to as a ballad with a big brass set of balls, “When Love Comes Down” is a surprisingly effective song. Musically, it is still pretty heavy and while the lyrics might be something like you would expect out of any ballad from this particular musical era, Carl Albert’s vocal embodying of the lyrics really sells the song.

After listening to the full album, I’m still not quite sure what to make of Vicious Rumors. They certainly have some great songs on this release, but they also have some songs that completely missed with me. However, I definitely am intrigued by that which I did like. This may have been my “welcome” to the band, but now I want to take off my jacket and sit a spell as I dig more in-depth into the Vicious Rumors back catalog.

NOTES OF INTEREST – Despite a myriad of lineup changes, the band is still going strong to this day. They recently announced a 30th anniversary tour for their 1988 album Digital Dictator.

The band’s first album was 1985’s Soldiers of the Night and featured guitar maestro Vinnie Moore.

The copy of the cassette in my possession might be a slight collector’s item as the cassette booklet appears to have been signed by singer Carl Albert. Sadly, he passed away in 1995 after a car accident.